220 V Wiring

Reply

  #41  
Old 09-11-11, 08:34 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,374
Yes, that is acceptable. fiopjoe
 
Sponsored Links
  #42  
Old 09-12-11, 09:54 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,296
Yes your location for the junction box is okay.

e: Oops, didn't see page two! Sorry, Furd.
 
  #43  
Old 09-12-11, 10:03 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 47
Hi all,
The sub panel that is providing for my oven is protected by a 30A breaker at the main panel.
The oven is protected by a 30A breaker on the sub panel.

Can you tell me if this precludes me from adding further circuits on the sub panel?
If I want to add a supply for an output on the kitchen island with a 20Amp breaker, can I draw from the sub panel?
 
  #44  
Old 09-12-11, 10:58 AM
belgarid's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 144
I think you will need to increase the size of the sub-panel. Depending on the panel and wire size you might be able to just replace the breaker. The sub-panel should be parked for the max amps it can handle. Also, what size is the wire between the sub-panel and main panel? This will determine what needs to be replaced to increase the capacity of the sub-panel.
 
  #45  
Old 09-12-11, 11:15 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 47
At this time, from a visual inspection, the wire between the main and the sub is atleast 10 gauge, copper.
Unfortunately, there is no marking on the wire cover (or is it called sheath), which is black in color.

Is there any color code for these wire covers?
The 10-3 I got for the oven has an orange sheath and the words 10/3 is written on it.
 
  #46  
Old 09-12-11, 12:02 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,669
Compare the size of the stripped #10 in the 10-3 cable you bought to what is in the subpanel. I asked before but will ask again is the subpanel supplied with 3 wire cable plus ground? Since the stove wasn't I'd be a bit surprised if the subpanel cable was.
 
  #47  
Old 09-12-11, 12:24 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 47
Ray,
The sub panel is supplied with 3 insulated wires and ground. I confirmed with a voltmeter that there's 120V between the neutral and either hot and 240 between the 2 hots. The stove was wired back to the main panel.

Regarding comparing size of the oven wire and the one in the sub box, my eyes are just not that good! I can safely say that the sub panel wire is atleast as thick as the oven wire. It maybe a bit thicker, but I will prefer to use some kind of a measuring instrument before making a statement.
 
  #48  
Old 09-12-11, 02:03 PM
belgarid's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 144
Is it a cable or individual conductors? If using a cable you would need #6 copper for a 50A sub-panel. If using individual conductors in conduit you would need #8 hots and neutral and #10 ground. Also, you need to look at the sub-panel and see what it's max amp rating is.
 
  #49  
Old 09-12-11, 06:40 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 47
I am a bit confused with all the vocabulary So, I will use a picture to help answer.
The left image is the subpanel. It is rated for a max of 100A. You can see the wire with the black sheath come in from the main panel.

On the right is the wire I bought for the new line to the oven from this sub panel.

 
  #50  
Old 09-13-11, 08:12 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,296
This appears to be a 30A subpanel, fed with #10-3/g, and should have a corresponding 30A double-pole breaker in the main panel.

The 30A oven would pretty much max out this subpanel. You technically could also run the 20A countertop circuit from here, but you would risk tripping the breaker when using both a countertop appliance and the oven. I would avoid doing so unless there is no other practical way.

If possible I would consider upgrading that subpanel to 60A by replacing the black cable with a #6-3/g cable, and replacing the 30A feeder breaker in the main panel with a 60A double-pole. Alternatively you could power only the oven from this panel and power the 20A countertop circuit from the main panel.

BTW, a cable is a collection of individual wires wrapped in overall outer sheath at the factory; they are usually called X-Y/g where X is the size in AWG, Y is the number of insulated wires in the cable and /g means with a bare ground wire. Your pictures are of cables. Another way to install circuits is to run conduit (pipe) between the panels and then pull individual wires in particular sizes and colors through the pipe. Different rules govern each method so it's an important distinction. The # sign or AWG (american wire gauge) refers to the thickness of the wire; smaller numbers are thicker wires; thicker wires can carry more amps. Any other vocabulary you need help with?
 
  #51  
Old 09-13-11, 03:12 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 47
Thanks for that elaborate explanation.
I will leave the subpanel as is and have the oven working from it.
The island is a future plan and I will upgrade the subpanel to 60A then.
Regards
Alex
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'