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Wiring a 15amp circuit with 12/2 to outlets and 14/2 and 14/3 to lights.

Wiring a 15amp circuit with 12/2 to outlets and 14/2 and 14/3 to lights.

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  #1  
Old 09-07-11, 04:37 PM
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Wiring a 15amp circuit with 12/2 to outlets and 14/2 and 14/3 to lights.

I'm putting together an electrical plan so I can apply for a building permit to remodel my house and have a question on wire sizes.

I was told that it would be ok, on a 15 amp circuit to run 12/2 to the receptacles and then run 14/2 and/or 14/3 to a switched light. Is there anything wrong with this?

This is what I was planning in the kitchen.
 
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Old 09-07-11, 04:58 PM
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In general code wise no. Confusion wise for the next person yes. Someone else later on may see the number 12 and not realizing there is #14 also increase the breaker size two 20 amps. Best practice don't intermix wire sizes.

Moot point perhaps since this is a kitchen. There must be two 20 amp dedicated circuits for the counter top receptacles. Nothing else can be on those circuits.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 09-08-11 at 07:20 AM. Reason: Remove incrorect statement.
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Old 09-07-11, 05:06 PM
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So I should either up the wire size to the lights to 12 and/or install a 20amp breaker. That would also mean I'd have to install 20amp receptacles as well correct? The 20amp breakers are the same price as the 20amp. 20amp receptacles cost a bit more than the 15.

Counter top receptacles are fed by 2 20amp circuits, with a GFCI receptacle for the first receptacle in the circuit.
 
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Old 09-07-11, 05:14 PM
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That would also mean I'd have to install 20amp receptacles as well correct?
No. As long as there are two places to plug you are OK. A single duplex receptacle meets that requirement.
 
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Old 09-07-11, 05:20 PM
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I would just use all #12 on a 20A breaker. I hate working with 14 in general, yet intermixing it with 12 is a real pita. You do not need to use 20A receptacles on a 20A circut. You should also not use cheap (50c) 15A receptacles. The backwired ones with the pressure plates are best.
 
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Old 09-07-11, 08:43 PM
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Like Ray said, you will need a minimum of two 20 amp circuits to serve the kitchen receptacles. Lighting cannot be part of this circuit. I would install a 15 amp circuit for the lighting.
 
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Old 09-08-11, 03:23 AM
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I have a total of 4 circuits in the kitchen
2 20amp GFCI protected circuits for the counter top outlets, and only the counter top outlets, nothing else will be on this circuit
1 20amp circuit dedicated for the refrigerator
1 15amp circuit for non-counter top outlets and 1 ceiling light


I'm going to increase the wire size to the lights to 12 so the entire circuit is the same wire size.
 
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Old 09-08-11, 06:01 AM
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Originally Posted by drummin89 View Post
I have a total of 4 circuits in the kitchen
2 20amp GFCI protected circuits for the counter top outlets, and only the counter top outlets, nothing else will be on this circuit
1 20amp circuit dedicated for the refrigerator
1 15amp circuit for non-counter top outlets and 1 ceiling light


I'm going to increase the wire size to the lights to 12 so the entire circuit is the same wire size.
Lighting and receptacle circuits cannot be mixed in the kitchens and dining rooms.
 
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Old 09-08-11, 07:48 AM
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Can the dining room and kitchen share a lighting circuit?
 
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Old 09-08-11, 09:28 AM
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Lighting can be shared throughout the house provided it is not also on a receptacle circuit that is required to be dedicated.

In other words, only specific receptacle circuits need to be dedicated and all other circuits (lights and receptacles) may be shared.
 
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