Replacing a Circuit breaker

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-06-01, 05:55 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I am having difficulty replacing a circuit breaker for my electric clothes dryer. It is in a 200amp Sylvania box and is a double 30amp Sylvania breaker. I have never changed one before and I dont know how to pull the old one out. There is a notch on the back right side of the breaker that is engaged on the board so pulling the breaker straight out is impossible. What's the trick?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-06-01, 07:02 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Normally you would pull up on just one side of the breaker, the side towards the middle of the panel.

Just so I'll sleep well tonight, please tell me why you're changing the breaker.
 
  #3  
Old 01-08-01, 10:04 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Fayetteville, NY, USA
Posts: 1,052
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
A breaker is usually hooked on the side you described, the side away from the centerline between 2 rows of breakers. Once hooked in that point acts sort of like a hinge. The breaker swings toward the center, away from you, where it snaps down with a sort of spring latch, mechanically and electrically connecting it to the "hot" bus. With the POWER OFF try to pry the breaker up from the center (left side of the breaker if you say the "notch" is on the right) and it will pivot out about an inch or so, then slide it 1/4" or so to the right and it will lift right out. I'd advise against prying with a metalic tool. I usually recommend something more like a DRY popsicle stick. That way you can't get a shock, and if you apply too much force the stick will bend or break before the breaker does. I must add that if you do not have an absolutely clear idea of where all the live parts are inside that box you will be subjecting yourself to extreme danger. One further caution is that you NOT be changing the breaker to a higher rated one (i.e. 40 amps, 50, etc.) simply because the 30 keeps tripping. The NEC requires breakers be sized according to your wire size. If the dryer is wired with #10 AWG then you may not legally increase the breaker rating above 30 amps. If the breaker keeps tripping you may have under-sized wiring on that circuit, loose connections at the breaker or at the dryer receptacle, or you may have a short circuit somewhere on that line. I would not change a breaker until I was sure it was the breaker where the defect is. If you're not certain let us know what symptoms you experienced and we will try to help you further.

Hope that helps. Please be careful.

Juice

[Edited by JuiceHead on 01-08-01 at 01:11]
 
  #4  
Old 01-08-01, 01:24 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Replacing Circuit Breaker

Thanks to John Nelson & Juicehead. The reason I am replacing the breaker is not because it's been tripping but that I believe it is defective. Here's what's been happening over the past year. My dryer suddenly does not heat up but the motor is running. Each time I have replaced a censor etc. I have turned off the power at the breaker...replaced the part...and it worked fine. I have replaced most of the parts that are replacable but recently the dryer did the same thing. I tripped the breaker and it came back on. I was ready to replace the dryer when a friend told me he had the same thing happen to him and it turned out to be a faulty breaker which was not working on one side of the 220. I have purchased a replacement breaker and that's when I had trouble getting the old one out. Does this make sense? Any further thoughts will be appreciated.
 
  #5  
Old 01-08-01, 02:02 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Fayetteville, NY, USA
Posts: 1,052
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Richard,

If you already have the replacement, it's the same amperage rating as the existing one, and you know how to wire it in (same as what's there) then go ahead and try it. Maybe it's as simple as that. A weak breaker is certainly not unheard of. If your problem persists return the new breaker and get your money back, then pursue other potential causes. If it comes to that try the Appliance section of the forum.

Juice
 
  #6  
Old 01-08-01, 04:43 PM
Wgoodrich
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
As you replace the breaker look for burn marks on the tabs the breaker plugs into. Also look for heating where the wires connect to the breaker. If your breaker does not cure the problem, then look for heating in the connections in the dryer receptacle and behind a plate in the back of the dryer where the pigtail connects to the dryer.
IF you find no heating due to a loose connection then check for heating of the connections at your thermo disks and at your connections to you heat elements. If you find no loose connections heating up at any of the suggested locations then open the console where your timer is located and look at the wires connected to the timer. These wires should be red or yellow wires. They will be the two biggest wires connected to the timer of the dryer.

I suspect your problem will be a loose connection at one of the above locations.

Good Luck

Wg
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: