EMT to Box connectors

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-12-11, 06:06 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,445
EMT to Box connectors

I have an EMT pipe that is very close to a metal box, about 2.5 inches. I wanted to bend that EMT pipe to connect to the box, but it is just too close for a gentle sweeping elbow to work. I cannot easily move the EMT pipe or the box.

So I am thinking to use one of these.



I know it will do the job. However, once I close up the wall, I will not be able to pull any wire through that elbow I don't think because it's such a tight turn, right?

Also, if I need to connect two boxes with a straight pipe, but one side the knock out hole is 3/4", the other side is 1/2", I need some way to transition the 3/4" to 1/2". I understand the 3/4"x1/2" washer is what I need to use, but there is no instructions. How is it used? Do you insert a washer into the connector, push the connector through the knock out hole, then insert another washer on the other side, then tighten the nut? In other words, you need to use two as a pair right? Or wrong?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-12-11, 06:18 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,213
How is it used? Do you insert a washer into the connector, push the connector through the knock out hole, then insert another washer on the other side, then tighten the nut? In other words, you need to use two as a pair right? Or wrong?
If I understand correctly, I think what you are planning is right on the reducing washers, they are used in pairs. Have you tried a pulling elbow yet, will that work for you? I don't like them, but I suppose they do have their place.
 
  #3  
Old 09-12-11, 08:04 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 11,981
Why not bend an offset and come in the bottom (or top) rather then the side?
 
  #4  
Old 09-12-11, 11:43 PM
Luana's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 143
A pulling elbow is an access point, no different than an ell fitting or J&P box. It cannot be buried in a wall but must remain permanently accessible.
 
  #5  
Old 09-13-11, 05:13 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,357
Would a offset fitting work? Can you post a pic?
 
  #6  
Old 09-13-11, 05:55 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,445
Yes an offset would work.

The only problem is I do not have a tube bender to do it, and I don't want to buy one just to do one offset pipe. But I think the offset is the best solution.

Thanks.
 
  #7  
Old 09-13-11, 06:01 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,646
 
  #8  
Old 09-13-11, 06:14 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,357
You can buy box offsets. Some have a coupling on the one end, others are male threads on both ends.
 
  #9  
Old 09-13-11, 06:43 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,445
I went and bought a tube bender.

$32.00 at Home Depot.

Why do they make one for 1/2" and one for 3/4"? I was hoping that by buying one I can bend both 1/2" and 3/4" tubes.

Oh will I be able to use that same bender to bend 1/2" soft copper supply pipes for plumbing?
 
  #10  
Old 09-13-11, 06:57 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,357
You need to keep the sidewalls from flattening so they make different size bender for each size of EMT or rigid.

I guess you could use it for soft drawn copper, but I have seen that bent by hand.
 
  #11  
Old 09-13-11, 06:58 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,357
Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Thanks Ray, that is one style I was trying to describe.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 09-13-11 at 08:43 PM.
  #12  
Old 09-13-11, 07:48 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 11,981
Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
That is called an offset nipple.

You could use a 3/4" bender to bend 1/2", it just doesn't do a very good job. If you only had one you needed to bend I bet you could have rented one. Or found an electrician on a job to bend one for you or borrow.

BWT - you can use a thin wall bender to bend rigid pipe, You just use one size larger.
 
  #13  
Old 09-13-11, 08:42 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,646
You could use a 3/4" bender to bend 1/2", it just doesn't do a very good job
Wonder if it would help to pack it with sand and plug the ends.
 
  #14  
Old 09-13-11, 09:00 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,445
I saw the offset nipple and thought about it, but it does not create enough of an offset, I needed something that offsets about 3".

The tube bender worked great. But now I am done with it.
 
  #15  
Old 09-14-11, 05:17 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 11,981
Originally Posted by MiamiCuse View Post
The tube bender worked great. But now I am done with it.
Maybe you can take it back? I'm sure you haven't wore it out.
 
  #16  
Old 09-14-11, 10:07 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,533
OK guys Im a newbie and an electrical ignoramus, but I was wondering why EMT is used inside walls? I thought EMT was used in exposed locations. Just curious!
 
  #17  
Old 09-14-11, 11:27 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,295
EMT is rare indoors in residential (except in NYC and Chicago where it's required by very strict codes). EMT is great for protection of the wiring and future upgrades, also great in masonry construction where future rework is really tough. In commercial and multi-unit residential, plastic wiring methods are restricted due to fire code so EMT is a logical choice, although MC or AC cable is usually more cost effective.
 
  #18  
Old 09-14-11, 05:19 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,533
Thanks for the good explanation Ben!
 
  #19  
Old 09-14-11, 05:58 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,213
I have an EMT pipe that is very close to a metal box, about 2.5 inches. I wanted to bend that EMT pipe to connect to the box, but it is just too close for a gentle sweeping elbow to work. I cannot easily move the EMT pipe or the box.
Here's another idea for you, but you don't normally see the pros using fittings like this. This fitting does not have to remain accessible and can be inside the wall.

Halex Company 90291 - 1/2in 90deg EMT Comprs Conn
 
  #20  
Old 09-24-11, 10:16 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: KS
Posts: 1,896
Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand View Post

BWT - you can use a thin wall bender to bend rigid pipe, You just use one size larger.
Not the ones Home Depot carries.. They're made of cheap-ass cast pot metal and the holding flange will break off if you try bending rigid with it..

Now ask me how I know..
 
  #21  
Old 09-25-11, 06:12 AM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,213
Originally Posted by JerseyMatt View Post
Not the ones Home Depot carries.. They're made of cheap-ass cast pot metal and the holding flange will break off if you try bending rigid with it..

Now ask me how I know..
Would that be like..a Gardner-Bender? GB makes some good tools, but they make the big box variety too.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'