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Why are 15A-125V receptacles on my 20A circuit breaker line?

Why are 15A-125V receptacles on my 20A circuit breaker line?

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  #1  
Old 09-20-11, 12:35 PM
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Why are 15A-125V receptacles on my 20A circuit breaker line?

My house is old - circa 1940 - and original Slater receptacles no longer hold plugs well. When I lost power from a SurgeMaster plugged into a kitchen wall outlet, I removed the SurgeMaster and plugged in a circuit tester. It showed a correct connection. I then pulled the outlet causing it to show an open ground (the box must have served as the ground connection) and opened 15A breakers (one at a time) checking the tester for absence of current. The tester continued to glow. Then I opened 20A breakers and on the 2nd one the circuit tester showed no current to the subject receptacle. When I removed the receptacle, I found it to be a 15A-125V.
 
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  #2  
Old 09-20-11, 12:41 PM
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In the USA, 15A receptacles are legal on a 20A circuit as long as there is more than one receptacle on the circuit. The 15A receptacles are rated for 20A pass-through, the only difference is the shape of the face plate.
 
  #3  
Old 09-20-11, 01:48 PM
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Is the wiring #12?

.........................
 
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Old 09-20-11, 05:01 PM
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What's a surgemaster?
 
  #5  
Old 09-20-11, 06:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Justin Smith View Post
What's a surgemaster?
A brand of surge protector.

In the USA, 15A receptacles are legal on a 20A circuit as long as there is more than one receptacle on the circuit
A duplex receptacle counts as two.
 
  #6  
Old 09-22-11, 04:11 AM
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Question Should Refrigerator be on a dedicated circuit

I have been researching the web and now understand that the line is 20A because it is in the kitchen. I have also learned that multiple 15A receptacles can be on 20A lines. It was a struggle replacing the receptacle because the wire was very strong and the receptacle box was non firmly attached to anything. I had to push the receptacle into the box while pulling the box out with needle nose pliers. It took me a good deal of time.

During this time I got thirsty and went to get a drink from my refrigerator. I then found the refrigerator to be on the same line as the wall duplex that I was working on. The oven timer continued to run showing the oven to be on another circuit. I also noted that the kitchen counter's wall outlets were on another circuit. Why not the refrigerator

P.S. The refrigerator is also plugged into a duplex outlet.
 
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Old 09-22-11, 05:39 AM
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The refrigerator is allowed to be fed from the small appliance countertop circuits.
 
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Old 09-22-11, 05:13 PM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
The refrigerator is allowed to be fed from the small appliance countertop circuits.
Although that is allowed, I prefer to see a refrigerator on a dedicated circuit with a single receptacle.
 
  #9  
Old 09-25-11, 05:20 AM
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Question Which Receptacle

Went to Home Depot to get replacement receptacle. They sell Leviton in grades: standard @$0.59; preferred (tamper proof) @$1.19 and professional @ over $5. Keeping in mind that the outlet is in a residential kitchen and household is me and my wife only - is there any reason for buying other than standard?
 
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Old 09-25-11, 06:31 AM
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Originally Posted by WappRecycler View Post
Went to Home Depot to get replacement receptacle. They sell Leviton in grades: standard @$0.59; preferred (tamper proof) @$1.19 and professional @ over $5. Keeping in mind that the outlet is in a residential kitchen and household is me and my wife only - is there any reason for buying other than standard?
The standard grade is what contractors would normally use unless they are under the 2008 NEC in which case they would probably use the tamper proof. Professional is a commercial grade device, but $5 seems a little high even for Home Depot ($2.50 to $3 seems about right to me), is that price for a 15 amp or 20 amp device? Where is this device going in the kitchen? It may need to be a GFI receptacle or tamper proof GFI receptacle.
 
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Old 09-25-11, 07:21 AM
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Originally Posted by WappRecycler View Post
Went to Home Depot to get replacement receptacle. They sell Leviton in grades: standard @$0.59; preferred (tamper proof) @$1.19 and professional @ over $5. Keeping in mind that the outlet is in a residential kitchen and household is me and my wife only - is there any reason for buying other than standard?
The Resi-grades will not last long at all. Some I just installed last weekend do not hold a plug anymore.

The $1.19 tamper proof are just the resi-grades with a tamper-resistant face. Aim for the TR receptacles marked "spec grade"

$5 seems a little high for spec grades. The spec grades at my supply house are $2.31. Are you sure they aren't hospital grades?

Gfci protection is required for the counter circuts.
 
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Old 09-25-11, 10:50 AM
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Since counter top kitchen appliances are often high current devices (coffee pots, waffle machines, electric griddles and the like) it is even more important to use high quality receptacles.
 
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Old 09-25-11, 11:52 AM
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What does TR "spec grade" mean

I must have missed a lot during my Home Depot stop. The website shows: Model #R51-CBR15-00I Store SKU # 707386
15-Amp Ivory Commercial Duplex Outlet @ $1.99 with 52 in stock;
and, Model #R52-12650-00W Store SKU # 713964 15-Amp White Duplex CO/ALR Outlet @ $2.98 with 25 in stock.

The outlet I wrote as Professional is Model #R51-05252-0IS Store SKU # 614743 Leviton Prograde 15-Amp Duplex Narrow-Body Outlet
selling for $5.44 @. It is not Hospital grade.

The receptacle is at the wall base (just above the hydronic baseboard heatling enclosure) by the kitchen table. It would normally remain unused except that the wall base receptacle behind my entertainment center cabinet is OOS along with the overhead kitchen light, the oven/stove hood, the overhead dining area light, and the back deck light. Intermitently the electrical interruption stopped for brief periods but it has been a long time since they temporarily came back to life.

I had to run a short extension cord from this kitchen outlet to get electricity to my entertainment center's power strip. With this outlet on the fritz, I have had to run a 25' cord drop light from another wall outlet in the kitchen because this one does not maintain dependable plug contact.
 
  #14  
Old 09-25-11, 12:22 PM
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Some (all?) of the Leviton ProGrade receptacles are back-wire. You insert the stripped wire into a hole in the back of the device then tighten the screw. The screw tightens a pressure plate which holds the wire. (not to be confused with the $0.59 back stab receptacles where you just push the wire into the hole and spring steel holds it in place... for a few years.

I stay away from those back-wire receptacles unless I'm using stranded wire. Not that it won't work with solid, but I find it's not worth the extra cost and hassle. I usually buy the $1.29 versions. Good quality and good value.

Whatever you do, stay away from the $0.59 models!
 
  #15  
Old 09-25-11, 12:42 PM
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TR is tamper resistant and spec grade is what is usually what is marked on a specification grade device.
Model #R51-CBR15-00I Store SKU # 707386
15-Amp Ivory Commercial Duplex Outlet @ $1.99 with 52 in stock;
This one sounds good.
Model #R52-12650-00W Store SKU # 713964 15-Amp White Duplex CO/ALR Outlet @ $2.98 with 25 in stock.
This is for aluminum wiring.
 
  #16  
Old 09-26-11, 02:27 AM
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I am reading your message as the Model #R51-CBR15-00I Store SKU # 707386
15-Amp Ivory Commercial Duplex Outlet @ $1.99 should be my choice. My wiring is clearly all copper so is should not need one for aluminum wiring.
 
  #17  
Old 09-26-11, 03:16 AM
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Things may have changed.
1. I have found no back-wire receptacles that take other than solid wire.
2. Even the $0.59 models have screws, which appear to be for stranded wire. I doubt that the screws provided push pressure plates because there are slots beside the solid wire insert holes. Those slots appear to be for pushing plates to release wires.

The dual language instructions on the recetacles are so small that I needed to use a lighted magnifier to read "PUSH IN #14 CU SOLID WIRE FOR 15A BRANCH CIRCUIT ONLY.
Use of magnifier confirmed that slots are for pushing plates to release wires and revealed which sides were for white and hot wires. Since these receptacles are sold from bulk rather than boxed with instructions, our going from a single language for all has created a likely safety hazzard. Any bets on results of improperly wiring receptacles?

Anyone want to bet on the kitchen wires not being #12 because they are on 20A breaker? I have never had to pull so hard to get a receptacle out of its box nor push so hard to get the receptacle back in. I may have to go to the 20A receptacles after all
 
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Old 09-26-11, 06:18 AM
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"PUSH IN #14 CU SOLID WIRE FOR 15A BRANCH CIRCUIT ONLY.
That is a back stab wire holder that does not use a pressure plate.
 
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