"Daisy Chain" receptacles

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Old 10-06-11, 07:39 PM
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"Daisy Chain" receptacles

As I replaced all the old receptacles in this house, today I did about twenty of them. Most of them do not have ground wires, so I added those.

Many of the metal box as I opened them, were half filled with mud. The wires were literally cemented into the mud. I had to chip the mud out and clean the boxes.

A couple of questions.

(1) I saw in some posts that wiring a receptacle using "backstab" is not recommended. Can someone clarify? Most of my old wires are #12 solid wires, so if I stick them into the holes in the back of the receptacle, and then tightened the screws, is this bad?

Or do I have to make a half moon loop with the wire and fit them under the screw and tighten?

(2) I noticed the receptacles were wired using two methods. The hot and neutral comes into the box, goes into the receptacle, then another hot and neutral come out of the other side of the receptacle, and continue to the next box. The other way is to use wire nuts to connect the wires, one in, one out, and one goes to the receptacle. Which way is better?
 
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Old 10-06-11, 07:54 PM
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If you use screws to tighten the wires, it is not backstab.

It is better to pigtail them. If there is ever a problem with one receptacle, it won't affect others on the circuit.
 
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Old 10-06-11, 07:57 PM
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(1) There are two different types of back of receptacle connections. The original version is called "back stab", this is where you push the wire into a hold on the back of the switch/receptacle and a spring holds it in place. This are the type NOT to use. The new and good kind are called "back wired", this allow you to slip the wire under a pressure plate that you then tighten using a screw. The "Back wired" are fine to use, you don't want to use the "back stab" connections.
 
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Old 10-06-11, 09:14 PM
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I also like to pigtail because of the same reasons that drooplug listed.
 
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Old 10-06-11, 09:18 PM
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So inserting the wire into the back and tighten the screws is OK. Is this true for both solid and stranded?
 
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Old 10-06-11, 09:26 PM
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Originally Posted by MiamiCuse View Post
So inserting the wire into the back and tighten the screws is OK. Is this true for both solid and stranded?
Yes. I prefer the back WIRED for stranded wire.
 
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Old 10-07-11, 06:25 AM
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Originally Posted by MiamiCuse View Post
So inserting the wire into the back and tighten the screws is OK. Is this true for both solid and stranded?
Those are called back-wired.

Side note, the newer backstab devices are only for use with #14 gauge wire.
 
 

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