how to tap into power from an exsisting switch/light

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Old 10-12-11, 07:18 PM
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how to tap into power from an exsisting switch/light

In my bathroom i have one switch. that switch powers one light. i want that one switch to power an exhaust fan. and i want a second switch to power 5 high hat lights. how do i use that one wire that runs from exsisting switch to exsisting light to make a second switch to power the new lights without them interfering with each other.
 
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Old 10-12-11, 07:57 PM
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how do i use that one wire that runs from exsisting switch to exsisting light to make a second switch to power the new lights
One wire will power nothing. I suspect you mean a cable which has two or more wires plus a ground. If you have only a single cable with two wires at the switch the switch does not power the light. It controls it. You can not run a fan from it with out adding a cable and finding a power source for the fan.
 
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Old 10-12-11, 08:03 PM
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by "that one wire" i mean like a standard 3 wire wrapped in rubber. black/white/ground. 14/3 i think idk im a wood worker
 
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Old 10-12-11, 08:28 PM
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by "that one wire" i mean like a standard 3 wire wrapped in rubber. black/white/ground. 14/3 i think
No that would be a 14-2 cable. The ground isn't counted. If that is all you have at the switch you will need to find a source of power for your fan. Power probably comes in at the light. You could run a 14-2 cable from the light to the fan then a 14-3* cable to the existing switch box for the new switch.

If it is easier you could also run power to the switch box first then to the fan. Power could also come from a receptacle on an unrestricted circuit. or directly from the main panel or nearest subpanel.

*Assumes NEC 2011.
 
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Old 10-12-11, 08:35 PM
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why does the exhaust fan need 14-3. if it is a fan that doesnt have a light within it, is 14-2 acceptable? So what you are describing is i use the exsisting switch/light set up for the new lights, and the new switch for the fan. thanks for your help btw
 
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Old 10-13-11, 04:32 AM
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Rays note about the 14-3 and the 2011 NEC was meant to cover the new requirement for a neutral at the switch, even if not used.
 
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