Space heater rated for damp areas (bathroom)

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  #1  
Old 10-13-11, 05:27 PM
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Space heater rated for damp areas (bathroom)

Is there such a thing as a portable space heater for a bathroom? Many articles on space heater safety seem to say to not use a space heater in the bathroom unless it's rated for wet/damp areas. However, I cannot find any space heaters that fit the bill.

I'm leery of leaving any space heater on unattended so I don't want to use one that comes on automatically. I just am looking for a portable heater that I can unplug and remove from the room when not in use and that will heat up the roughly 8' x 14' bathroom relatively quickly and safely.
 
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Old 10-13-11, 06:05 PM
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Almost any heater would work as long as it is plugged into a proper GFCI outlet. Some have tip over switches (well, at least they used to) and if kept away from splash areas should be fine.

8 x 14 is pretty big for a bathroom. Heating it quickly would be problematic since most portable heaters are only 1500watts max. Bout the same as a good blowdryer on high. If you own the home, a permanently wired 220V wall or baseboard heater might be a better option.
 
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Old 10-13-11, 06:42 PM
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How do you define quickly? I used one of those oil filled space heaters in an apartment I used to live it. It probably took 10 minutes before it was nice and toasty.
 
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Old 10-13-11, 06:50 PM
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Originally Posted by drooplug View Post
How do you define quickly? I used one of those oil filled space heaters in an apartment I used to live it. It probably took 10 minutes before it was nice and toasty.
I use one also when the outside temperature gets ahead of my gas space heater in my 12X15 bedroom. They are very nice. They have a much larger radiating area and usually don't run continuously so may use less electricity. I would recommend a dedicated circuit.
 
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Old 10-13-11, 07:32 PM
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My supply house had a forced air heater last winter that would've worked. I forget who made it, but it was red and plugged into a 6-20 receptacle.
 
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Old 10-13-11, 07:38 PM
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I forget who made it,
I'd bet it was someone of Asian persuasion.
 
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