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connect 6-50 3 wire generator output to CS6364 4 wire gentran input

connect 6-50 3 wire generator output to CS6364 4 wire gentran input

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  #1  
Old 10-17-11, 11:53 AM
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connect 6-50 3 wire generator output to CS6364 4 wire gentran input

Hi all, I'm new to this forum and I would appreciate any info you might be able to provide for me. I have a manual transfer switch (flip off one breaker and flip on another) subpanel in my garage, it has a 50A breaker generator input and a 70A breaker utility input from the main panel, the 50A breaker connects to a CS6365 (4 wire) connector in a box on the side of the house.

I recently bought a used Generac 10000EXL that has a 6-50 (3 wire) receptacle that seems to be meant for use with a welder. I called the GenTran company, they said I could get a 6-50P plug, 6/4 cable, and CS6364 plug, and connect them together with the ground and neutral wires tied together, connecting the generator ground to both ground and neutral on the panel side. Is this correct and safe? I saw another post in here http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...or-ground.html that talks about disconnecting the neutral and ground in the generator, Is that necessary?

I would greatly appreciate some expert advice!
 
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  #2  
Old 10-17-11, 05:29 PM
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Additional info: the neutral bars in both panels are connected together as checked with an ohmmeter, and the gentran neutral wire coming in to the subpanel is also tied to neutral bar, so neutral is not being switched. So if I understand it correctly, this is NOT a separately derived system. I'm not sure if that means I should tie them together or not, but hopefully that helps for somebody answering my question. I think this means that neutral and ground would be tied together in more than one place and could cause a loop that could be a problem in some situations. The more I read the more I am confused!
 
  #3  
Old 10-19-11, 05:45 AM
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That generator came from the factory with a 14-50 receptacle. IF someone swapped it out with a 6-50 then your easiest course of action would be to spend 8 bucks for a new 14-50 recep. and swap it back to the factory configuration.

If you are just going to use the generator only when connected to your transfer switch then the bonding jumper that connects the neutral and ground should be removed in the generator. However, it would need to be repaced if you ever wanted to operate the generator as a stand alone unit.
 
  #4  
Old 10-19-11, 08:47 AM
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Thanks for the reply Auger01. I found out that there are a couple of versions of the Generac 10000EXL. http://www.shinhwan.co.kr/use/10000exl.pdf is one version, which has the 14-50. I have the other version. I got the owners manual from Briggs and Stratton and the owners manual shows the 6-50 plug. The schematic is not a very clear copy, so it is difficult to determine where the neutral is in it. I opened the panel with the plugs, I don't see anything that I can identify as a bonding jumper. Also, the label does not specify whether the neutral is bonded or floating.
 
  #5  
Old 10-19-11, 09:32 AM
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The wiring schematic in the PDF you posted suggests that the neutral and ground are bonded by neutral wire #22 somewhere near the 120V receptacle. The neutral wire will be the one that connects to the wide-blade (usually silver screw) side of the 120V receptacle. Trace that one around and you will find all of the neutral attachment points.
 
  #6  
Old 10-19-11, 09:52 AM
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Sorry, I had gotten the correct manual in an email, but I found it online - this is the version that I have
http://www.briggsandstratton.com/doc...71TRI_B_LO.pdf - it is model 09801-1 at Manuals | Customer Support | Briggs & Stratton
The wires are pushed into the receptacles rather than connected with a screw, but I will look again at the other receptacles and trace neutral from them to try and find the jumper. Hopefully the labeling on the back of the receptacle will specify neutral. I would post a picture but I don't see any way to attach files here. Should the wire have a label that says #22?
 
  #7  
Old 10-19-11, 11:00 AM
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Its possibile that the wire is marked, but I doubt it.

Since your generator came with the 6-50, you could install a 14-50 receptacle in place of the 6-50. You would just need to add neutral wire from another receptacle. At least an 8ga wire for the neutral.

Another possibility is just using the 14-30 recep on the generator. It would limit you to 30amps continous, but I would be suprised if you used more than that continously.

Connecting the 6-50 to your 50 amp inlet will only work if you DONT remove that jumper. If you remove the jumper then use a 3 wire cord to hook up the 6-50 recep, you will have an open neutral which is BAD BAD BAD. Bad as in it will probably fry all you 120 volt appliances, TV etc. Obviously, I dont recommend this last option.
 
  #8  
Old 10-19-11, 01:02 PM
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I still did not put the correct link I see, that was the engine part - this is it http://bsintek.basco.com/BriggsDocum...pFFtPisZVj5K1w
I'm not sure if 30A is enough, but my subpanel input is a 50A breaker, I'd guess that and the CS6365 connector would need to be changed if I went with 30A. I will trace things out and see if there is a jumper, if not I will see if I can replace the receptacle with a 14-50 and connect the neutral. Thank you for your advice.
 
  #9  
Old 10-27-11, 04:38 PM
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I have replaced the 6-50 with a 14-50. I found the neutral wire and I also found the jumper on the 120 receptacle as ibpooks described. I connected the neutral through the 14-50 along with the other receptacles. Since I only intend to use it with my subpanel transfer switch I have removed the jumper as Auger1 suggested.

I compared the schematics of my model vs the newer version that comes with the 14-50. For the most part the wiring seems to be similar and the schematic with the newer version is easier to read. I see there are two 45A breakers - one on each of the hot sides, which my generator does not have, they are in front of the 11 and 44 hot wires which the other breakers feed from. I'm thinking I could get a couple of these, drill holes and mount them, and wire them in like the newer version. The manual says not to use more than 41.7A for the load, since the transfer switch has a 50A breaker it might be nice to have the lower limit of 45A.

I have ordered a 14-50 to CS6364 cable, so when that arrives I can try it out.
 

Last edited by highland58; 10-27-11 at 07:11 PM.
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