Max load rating on appliance circuit

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  #1  
Old 10-20-11, 07:55 AM
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Max load rating on appliance circuit

Hi all,
I'm trying to balance out my kitchen circuits and I have a few items left to find homes for.

Here are the items and their max draws:
Built in microwave: 13A (plug)
Built in coffee maker: 11.7A
Vent Hood: 3.8A
Warming Drawer: 3.75A (plug)
Stove sparker: 0.7A (plug)

Originally, I was going to group the MW/WD together and the Hood/stove/coffee, but that ends up with 16.75A and 16.2A total on each, respectively. This is above the 80%, but I'm not sure if that applies here. In this case, I can see them all being used simultaneously.

I'm running out of room on the panel, so I'd like to save a circuit if at all possible. Worst case, I can move the stove sparker to my basement lighting circuit (where it was before).

Any ideas? Am I right about the 80% being the max capacity on ANY circuit?

Thanks,
Anthony
 
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  #2  
Old 10-20-11, 08:38 AM
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Personal experience - don't put anything else on the microwave circuit.

I know you're running out of room in the panel but I'd use three circuits here if that coffee maker sees anything more than occasional use.
 
  #3  
Old 10-20-11, 09:51 AM
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Originally Posted by arc2v View Post
Built in microwave: 13A (plug)
Built in coffee maker: 11.7A
These each need dedicated circuits because they are built-ins. For a "fastened in place" appliance, it requires a dedicated circuit if the appliance will draw more than 50% of the branch circuit capacity. Both exceed 50% of a 20A circuit.

Vent Hood: 3.8A
Warming Drawer: 3.75A (plug)
These could be powered by a general-purpose lighting or receptacle circuit, but not one that powers kitchen, dining or pantry receptacles. Either would be okay to share with a dishwasher or disposal if you happen to have those available.

Stove sparker: 0.7A (plug)
This can be powered by one of the small-appliance branch circuits that feeds kitchen countertop receptacles or any general-purpose circuit.
 
  #4  
Old 10-20-11, 11:20 AM
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Thanks.

I may just bite the bullet and do a new subpanel. I have to make a junction box for the upstairs lighting circuits next to the main panel anyway, so it won't be too much hassle to just go with a new panel. It will let me clean up the existing (full) panel too.

Question about subpanel: since they will be right next to one-another, can I just have a breaker in the main panel and use a main-lug style subpanel? Or is code now such that both sides need a disconnect even if they are in close proximity?

This is what I'm considering:
Shop Eaton Cutler-Hammer 12-Circuit 12-Space 125-Amp Main Lug Load Center at Lowes.com
 
  #5  
Old 10-20-11, 11:33 AM
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The subpanel does not need a main breaker as long as it is in the same building as the panel feeding it. A main breaker is only required when the subpanel is in a separate building.
 
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Old 10-20-11, 12:10 PM
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That's what I thought, but I'm not always up on code changes. I'll read up and do some shopping online tonight. I'm sure I'll be back with some questions.

Thanks all.
 
  #7  
Old 10-20-11, 05:56 PM
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This is what I'm considering:
Shop Eaton Cutler-Hammer 12-Circuit 12-Space 125-Amp Main Lug Load Center at Lowes.com
That would work fine, but I'd never put in a subpanel with just 12 circuits, I'd suggest at least 24 circuits.
 
  #8  
Old 10-21-11, 05:02 PM
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Wire size for the feeder

Just a check-my-math question:

6/3 NMB okay for a 60 amp breaker feeding the sub panel? I imagine it is not going to be more than 15' of cable total. Obviously totally indoors, just stapled down to a joist or two overhead.

Thanks.
 
  #9  
Old 10-21-11, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by arc2v View Post
I may just bite the bullet and do a new subpanel...
That is pretty much what I think should be done with kitchens these days. So many things which use a lot of amperage. Deep fryer, hot plate, coffee maker, waffle iron, or anything which heats.

When I redo my kitchen, I think I will have double outlets (4 total) at each countertop location and each on its own 20 amp breaker!

The real test is during a holiday like Thanksgiving when you have everything going at the same time...
 
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Old 10-21-11, 06:21 PM
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Originally Posted by arc2v View Post
Just a check-my-math question:

6/3 NMB okay for a 60 amp breaker feeding the sub panel? I imagine it is not going to be more than 15' of cable total. Obviously totally indoors, just stapled down to a joist or two overhead.

Thanks.
6-3 NM B is fine for 60 amps, but if the panels are right next to each other, about half that amount should work.
 
  #11  
Old 10-21-11, 06:41 PM
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There's a little bit of distance between them to accommodate the 2nd floor lighting circuits. They were in a demo'd soffit and I had to reroute. The long route in the stud bay will leave me about 3' short to the main panel.

I figured 5' apart, 3' of slack in the main panel and 2' of slack in the new panel + extra to go up and over.

Thanks for the confirmation on the 6-3. I'll try and get these parts ordered this weekend.
 
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