220 Radial Arm Saw

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Old 10-24-11, 04:50 PM
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220 Radial Arm Saw

Just want to make sure I'm wiring this correctly.
I need a 220 outlet for a radial arm saw. It's coming off a subpanel in the garage.
The saw is rated for 7 amps. It has a 3-Prong plug.
I was going to run 12/2 w/ground to a double pole 20amp breaker with the ground going to the ground bar in the subpanel.
Is this correct?
Also, when installing a double pole breaker, how do you check if it's on separate legs? Would the voltage between the two legs equal 220 or zero?

Thanks, Brian
 
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Old 10-24-11, 04:55 PM
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Wiring with 12/2 is ok as long as the saw does not require a neutral for any electronics on it. Hook white and black to the double pole breaker and the ground to the grounding lug. You can't install a double breaker to where it is not properly positioned to pick up opposite legs. Voltage between the legs is supposed to be 240 volts. You will need a 240 volt receptacle and make sure the plug on the ras is configured for 240 volts as well.
 
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Old 10-24-11, 05:04 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Hook white and black to the double pole breaker and the ground to the grounding lug.
Reidentify the white with black tape.

Originally Posted by chandler View Post
You can't install a double breaker to where it is not properly positioned to pick up opposite legs.
Not entirely true. Some GE panels that use the THQP breakers, you can have a two pole breaker on one phase. If you do not have a GE panel then you have no worries.
 
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Old 10-24-11, 05:32 PM
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That would be a tandem configuration, not a two pole. THQPs are half inch breakers and for all intents and purposes serve the same purpose as tandems.

Maybe it should just be clarified that a 'double pole' breaker is one where the handles are tied together (or in the case of a QO panel, a two inch wide breaker with single handle)
 
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Old 10-24-11, 05:49 PM
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Thanks Guys,
Looks like I'm OK.
The saw has a 220 plug, with the prongs aligned sideways.
There are no electronics on the saw.

I'll identify the white as hot with black tape.

Thanks, Brian
 
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Old 10-24-11, 06:04 PM
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Originally Posted by JerseyMatt View Post
That would be a tandem configuration, not a two pole. THQPs are half inch breakers and for all intents and purposes serve the same purpose as tandems.

Maybe it should just be clarified that a 'double pole' breaker is one where the handles are tied together (or in the case of a QO panel, a two inch wide breaker with single handle)
Not quite. As TI indicated, it is possible to install a 2 pole type THQP GE breaker in a GE panel and not pick up both legs or 240 volts. By the way, a 2 pole Square D breaker is 1 1/2" wide.
 
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Old 10-24-11, 07:35 PM
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Originally Posted by JerseyMatt View Post
That would be a tandem configuration, not a two pole. THQPs are half inch breakers and for all intents and purposes serve the same purpose as tandems.
Here is the THQP I was referencing: Amazon.com: General Electric THQP215 Circuit Breaker, 2-Pole 15-Amp Thin Series: Sports & Outdoors It is a THQP two pole breaker. Note the handle tie. This could be installed (Improperly) on one phase in a GE panel.
_______________________________________
 
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Old 10-24-11, 07:56 PM
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Ahh I see what you're saying. I didnt realize a handle-tied version existed.
 
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Old 10-25-11, 05:41 AM
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Thanks, Scott. Likewise, I was unaware there were half breakers with tied handles to occupy one space. Live and learn. We'll clarify, a normal sized breaker can't be installed to where it will only pick up one leg. Question....what would these be used for MWBC?
 
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Old 10-25-11, 08:56 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Thanks, Scott. Likewise, I was unaware there were half breakers with tied handles to occupy one space. Live and learn. We'll clarify, a normal sized breaker can't be installed to where it will only pick up one leg. Question....what would these be used for MWBC?
They can be used for a MWBC or for (in the case of the linked example) a 15 amp 240 volt application such as an electric heater. The 2 pole type THQP (thin) breakers are available through 50 amps as far as I know. In other words,they could be used for an electric water heater, central a-c unit, electric range, electric dryer, etc. That being said, I don't like them and wouldn't recommend using them, especially in aluminum bus GE loadcenters. They are, however, U.L. Listed.
 
 

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