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Can you support two garage door opener motors with one single circuit?

Can you support two garage door opener motors with one single circuit?


  #1  
Old 10-31-11, 12:11 PM
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Can you support two garage door opener motors with one single circuit?

I have a 15A circuit that supplies all the lighting, receptacles and one garage door opener.

Then I have a 20A circuit dedicated to the second garage door opener.

Same standard Sears garage door openers.

I didn't think much of it but I was in the attic the other day and noticed that the 15A circuit was carried all the way with EMT conduits to the location of the second garage door opener above the ceiling, but it just terminated right there in the junction box and the wires capped.

Instead, the second garage door opener was plugged into a ceiling duplex receptacle that is supplied by a romex cable (the ONLY romex in the entire house), connected the other end to a dedicated 20A circuit. When the EMT supplied junction box is literally six inches away.

This puzzled me. It almost looked like they had planned on using the original circuit that supplied everything in the garage, but then had to run a romex from another circuit instead. Is there any reason to think the original circuit won't work?

I tested the conductors in the EMT supplied JB, and the wires are hot. I am scratching my head.

I am tempted to just eliminate the romex wire and connect to the JB there instead...but something tells me they did it for a reason.
 
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Old 10-31-11, 12:17 PM
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A 20A circuit should have no problem powering a couple door openers. BTW, ceiling receptacles need to be GFCI protected now while you're up there.
 
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Old 10-31-11, 12:25 PM
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They may have had some sort of tools that kept tripping the breaker?

Maybe you can repurpose that 20A to a dedicated tool outlet if you need it?

btw...just wondering...do you need to use conduit for all electrical down there?
 
  #4  
Old 10-31-11, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
They may have had some sort of tools that kept tripping the breaker?

Maybe you can repurpose that 20A to a dedicated tool outlet if you need it?

btw...just wondering...do you need to use conduit for all electrical down there?
No, no need to use conduits, I use it for this property to keep with existing.
 
  #5  
Old 10-31-11, 10:18 PM
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ibpooks. what code states that ceiling receptacles have to be g.f.c.i. protected.
 
  #6  
Old 11-01-11, 04:00 AM
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Starting in 2008 NEC, the exception that allowed for receptacles that were for dedicated equipment or not readily accessible was removed. Now all receptacles in a garage have to be GFCI protected. 210.8(A)(2)
 
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Old 11-01-11, 03:59 PM
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Not true! it wasnt removed it was just moved to the header of 210.8! 210.8 states Ground-fault circuit interruption for personnel shall be provided as required in 210.8(a) through (c). The ground -fault circuit-inerrupter shall be installed in a readily accessible location. Which covers 210.8(A)(2)The definition of readily accessible occording to the N.E.C states Capable of being reached quickly for operation,renewal,or inspections without requiring those to whom ready access is requisite to climb over or remove obstacle or to resort to portable ladders, and so forth.
 

Last edited by bobbi 5; 11-01-11 at 04:39 PM.
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Old 11-01-11, 07:22 PM
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Sorry to say Bobbi, but it is true. Before 2008, there was the exception that you stated, about the receptacle not being readily accessible it doesn't require it to be GFCI protected. In 2008 that exception was removed. That is why you see the bullet (.) next to (3) Outdoors in the 2008 code book. That indicates something was removed. (the exception)

There was also another exception for single receptacles feeding a non-easily moved appliance. This was also removed in 2008.
 
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Old 11-01-11, 07:30 PM
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Scott and Kyle are correct about the exception being removed and GFI protection is needed everywhere in the garage.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 11-02-11 at 04:30 AM.
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Old 11-01-11, 11:58 PM
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the 2011 code has some new stuff added to the header right at the top of 210.8 what does that apply to then
 
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Old 11-02-11, 03:29 AM
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Looks like the addition to the 2011 tries to clear up a grey area about the location of the GFCI protective device.

For example, the 2008 only states that receptacles in a garage have to be GFCI protected. No problem, put a GFCI receptacle in the ceiling for the door opener. Might not be convenient, but the ’08 code doesn’t say it has to be readily accessible, so it’s good. Put a fan in a shower stall that requires GFCI protection, mount a GFCI behind the access panel for the shower valve. By ’08 code this is acceptable also. The fan is protected and ’08 doesn’t specify that it has to be readily accessible. 2011 changed it so neither one of the above scenarios are acceptable anymore.
 
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Old 11-02-11, 03:36 AM
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Smile

Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
Scott is correct about the exception being removed and GFI protection is needed everywhere in the garage.
What am I, chopped liver? Did I pick the wrong day to quit sniffin glue again?
(running joke with pcboss & myself)
 
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Old 11-02-11, 04:29 AM
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Sorry Kyle, I saw Scotts post re Bobbis post and wanted to confirm to Bobbi that Scott was correct.

I will edit my post to give you credit also.
 
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Old 11-02-11, 11:33 AM
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if a homeowner or a do-it-yourselfer would read the 2011 code they would read the 210.8 header that applies to the hole section and read the header as saying readiliy accessible and not put in a G.F.C.I in their ceiling. So what is the header referring to just certain areas of 210.8(A)Through(C).Which part is it reffering to? if you dont know just say so.
 
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Old 11-02-11, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by bobbi 5 View Post
if a homeowner or a do-it-yourselfer would read the 2011 code
A layperson would be confused reading most any part of the code. It is a technical publication filled with jargon and precisely defined language which is intended for people trained in the art.

they would read the 210.8 header that applies to the hole section and read the header as saying readiliy accessible and not put in a G.F.C.I in their ceiling.
That is correct. The GFCI device shouldn't be in the ceiling (according to 2011 edition), but the ceiling receptacle should be GFCI protected. That means you can use downstream protection from a readily accessible GFCI device or use a GFCI breaker on the circuit.
 
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Old 11-02-11, 05:30 PM
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@ Bobbi - What book are you using? The 2011 NEC NFPA 70? (Black cover with white 2008) Or are you using some type of NEC handbook? The header you are referring to does not appear in my NEC code book. It only reads:

210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel

Then it lists a FPN

Then it goes to (A) Dwelling Units.
 
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Old 11-03-11, 02:27 PM
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2011 code book they added a header it states it applys for the whole section
 
  #18  
Old 11-03-11, 05:17 PM
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That is correct bobbi. Previous versions of the NEC did not state that a GFCI receptacle had to be readily accessible.
 
 

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