Wire a GFCI combo switch/outlet with outlet always on?

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-20-11, 05:51 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 52
Wire a GFCI combo switch/outlet with outlet always on?

I am replacing my non-GFCI combo switch/outlet in my bathroom (right next to the sink...how did this every fly I do not know...) with a GFCI combo switch/outlet.

I have incoming power that I will hookup to the line terminals and will have the load terminals going to my light. I would like the outlet to always remain "on" though (on the non-GFCI outlets I would break the brass tab to accomplish this feat, but the GFCI has no such tab).

How can I achieve this and will the outlet still be GFCI-protected? I don't care if the switch portion is GFCI-protected, just the outlet (otherwise what's the point...).

Thanks.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-20-11, 05:57 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,361
Can you provide the model number of the GFI/switch and the brand.

There should have been a wiring diagram on the package.
 
  #3  
Old 11-20-11, 07:30 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 52
Cooper VGFS15

Switch/GFCI Receptacles, VGFS15_-MSP

Has 2 black wires coming out the back of it (straight out of the box), no clue what those are for...maybe I got the wrong model? Do all combo GFCI swithc/outlets have these extra 2 wires sticking out? Sorry 2 threads in one now I guess...
 
  #4  
Old 11-21-11, 05:15 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,662
The black wires are the switch.
 
  #5  
Old 11-24-11, 09:44 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 52
Ok, so can you assist with how exactly to wire my setup per the initial question I posted?

GFCI outlet: 2 brass screws, 2 silver screws, 2 black switch wires out the back, 1 ground screw

2 incoming wires, one provides power, the other goes to the light.

Would like the GFCI outlet always on. Can that be done and still be protected? If yes, how should I wire it to achieve that? If no, how should I wire it anyways?

Thanks a lot!
 
  #6  
Old 11-24-11, 10:58 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,662
Connect neutral of "power in" and neutral from the light to the silver terninal the line side of the GFCI .

Connect "power in" hot and one of the black wires from the switch to the brass terminal of the line side of the GFCI.

Connect the remaining black wire of the switch to the hot wire to the light.

Connect all grounds using pigtails to the GFCI and box if metal.

Notes:
Some GFCI terminals only accept one wire. If so pigtail. If you have screws you will need to pigtail. If you have back-wired pressure plates it will probably accept two wires.

This does not provide GFCI protection for the light but that is considered okay by many because it is not required and you aren't left in the dark if the GFCI trips.
 
  #7  
Old 11-24-11, 01:34 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 52
Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Connect neutral of "power in" and neutral from the light to the silver terninal the line side of the GFCI .

---->This can both go into the pressure plate slots (there are 2 holes for each screw) in the back, no need to bother with the screw, right? Just as safe/reliable going into the holes instead? Will make my life a lot easier, less wire nuts & pigtails & twisting, more room in the box, etc.

Connect "power in" hot and one of the black wires from the switch to the brass terminal of the line side of the GFCI.

---->Can I push the "power in" hot into the pressure slot as well and then I can just wrap the switch wire around the screw (i.e. no issues having one in the slot, one around the screw)?

Connect the remaining black wire of the switch to the hot wire to the light.

--->Will do this with a wire nut?

Connect all grounds using pigtails to the GFCI and box if metal.

Notes:
Some GFCI terminals only accept one wire. If so pigtail. If you have screws you will need to pigtail. If you have back-wired pressure plates it will probably accept two wires.

This does not provide GFCI protection for the light but that is considered okay by many because it is not required and you aren't left in the dark if the GFCI trips.
--->So nothing on the load side at all, correct?

--->Thank you so much for you time and answers, especially on turkey day. Much appreciated!
 
  #8  
Old 11-24-11, 06:37 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,662
no need to bother with the screw, right?
The screw is not there for the wire. It is to tighten the pressure plate.

->Can I push the "power in" hot into the pressure slot as well and then I can just wrap the switch wire around the screw (i.e. no issues having one in the slot, one around the screw)?
There are usually two slots. Also see previous answer. If there is only one slot pigtail the wires and run the pigtail to the back-wire terminal.

So nothing on the load side at all, correct?
Correct unless you want this to power another receptacle.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'