Am I required to have a plug type outlet for a Range?


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Old 11-25-11, 06:31 AM
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Am I required to have a plug type outlet for a Range?

Iím rewiring for a new range. Instead of buying a cord (that doesnít come with it) and a new outlet, why canít I run the wire thru the box, use some kind of stain relief faceplate and hard wire into the range?
 
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Old 11-25-11, 07:02 AM
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Solid wire is not designed to be moved. Bend it back and forth so many times, then it will break like a coat hanger.

Appliance cords are designed to be moved as they use stranded wire. So ok to move the appliance for cleaning under it. Also with a plug you can unplug the range and move it out of the way to install a new floor or whatever.

Also think about the future. If at some point you are no longer around and someone else in your family needs to get a new range, they might have to hire an electrician to install an outlet. Or if you sell the house, a home inspector would surely write that up as something which needed fixing. And at that point in the sale, you might be required to have a licensed electrician do the work. A lender or FHA might require that.

For example I have seen wording like this for loans...
"All repairs/work must be completed within (6) months of the closing date. Repairs must be completed by a contractor unless the borrower can demonstrate the required expertise/experience (ie: plumbing repairs would require a licensed plumber, electric work would require a licensed electrician)."
OR mortgages : OR mortgage rates and home loans
 
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Old 11-25-11, 07:27 AM
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Why don't you want to use a cord set and receptacle?

The reason they don't come with a cord set is because there are two different types of receptacles the purchaser might have and the manufacturer can't know which.
 
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Old 11-25-11, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
The reason they don't come with a cord set is because there are two different types of receptacles the purchaser might have and the manufacturer can't know which.
I don't agree. Back when there was only one standard for cord/receptacle the manufacturers STILL didn't include the cord. They never did (and still don't) on electric clothes dryers either. I think it is a practice that once started is all but impossible to break.

I have found that the cordset IS a negotiable item when purchasing new equipment so while a new receptacle may be needed you can get the cord supplied by the appliance retailer.

One more thing...I'm pretty sure that except for a "fixed in place" (i.e. built-in) appliance the National Electrical Code requires a means to disconnect the appliance from the electrical supply. The cord and receptacle arrangement is the least expensive and easiest.
 
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Old 11-25-11, 01:36 PM
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A disconnect would also be required for a fixed in place appliance that was hard wired. The cord and plug can serve as the disconnect for the stove.
 
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Old 11-25-11, 01:55 PM
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Thanks for the replies, I didnít think about the disconnect requirement. Iíll use a standard outlet.
 
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Old 11-25-11, 02:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Tourglide1 View Post
Thanks for the replies, I didnít think about the disconnect requirement. Iíll use a standard outlet.
Just remember you will need a total of four wires, ground wire*, two hots and a neutral. Three wire is no longer code compliant. #8 for 40 amp and #6 for 50 amp. Use a NEMA 14-50 receptacle for both 40a and 50a.

*If metal conduit is used uninterrupted to the breaker box and a metal junction box for the receptacle code doesn't require a ground wire but it is a good idea.
 
 

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