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Portable generator to dedicated circuit in house (Not relay)

Portable generator to dedicated circuit in house (Not relay)

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  #1  
Old 11-27-11, 10:56 AM
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Portable generator to dedicated circuit in house (Not relay)

I have a portable generator with floating neutral that I want to conveniently connect to a few dedicated outlets in the basement (Refuge with gaz stove for power outages).

Normally the ground would go from the outlet to the generator.
Then the ground would be bonded to the neutral at the generator and the generator frame would be grounded to something (Rod, cold water pipe, etc).

Now that's a lot of back and forth as the generator would be grounded to the same thing my electrical panel is grounded to (Cold water pipe).

Since my generator has floating neutral, would this work?



That way, the generator frame is grounded if the generator itself generates static. Then the outlets would be also grounded, all on the same reference ground.
 
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  #2  
Old 11-27-11, 11:09 AM
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If your generator has a GFCI on it, use a regular outlet. (Don't install one GFCI after another.)

And I assume you will unplug the gas stove, then plug it into the generator outlet
when there is a power failure?

I would recommend running a ground wire directly and separate to the ground point (water pipe).

Then the whole works would be separate from your electric system.

I don't know what code would say about this???

And also you might want to try running your gas stove from the generator before
going to all this work. Many generators produce "dirty electricity". Some new electronically
controlled furnaces will not work when powered by these generators. An "online pure sine"
UPS will clean up that electricity. Or an "electronics friendly" generator will work.
 
  #3  
Old 11-27-11, 11:23 AM
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Yes that would be a reasonable means to earth ground the generator, assuming I understand you correctly that the generator is not actually connected to the home's electrical system. You unplug the appliances you want and then plug them into the generator. The only connection to the house is to the grounding electrode conductor (large bare wire to the rods and water service).
 
  #4  
Old 11-27-11, 11:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Bill190 View Post
If your generator has a GFCI on it, use a regular outlet. (Don't install one GFCI after another.)
No the generator doesn't have GFCI. Hence why I'm going to put one in front of all other electrical outlets I'd install on that circuit.


Originally Posted by Bill190 View Post
And I assume you will unplug the gas stove, then plug it into the generator outlet
when there is a power failure?
Well it's not a range. It's a stove/fireplace, just for heat. It doesn't require electricity except for lighting up the flame (Which uses manual button like on BBQs)


Originally Posted by Bill190 View Post
I would recommend running a ground wire directly and separate to the ground point (water pipe).

Then the whole works would be separate from your electric system.
Good idea, it would actually shorten the distance to the actual ground.


Originally Posted by Bill190 View Post
I don't know what code would say about this???
Well to me it seems to fit all the criteria. One bonded neutral point, before the outlets. Everything's grounded.



Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
Yes that would be a reasonable means to earth ground the generator, assuming I understand you correctly that the generator is not actually connected to the home's electrical system. You unplug the appliances you want and then plug them into the generator. The only connection to the house is to the grounding electrode conductor (large bare wire to the rods and water service).
Correct. My goal is that I'd have to connect what I need to those outlets linked to the generator.
It wouldn't be many things anyway. My TV and computer behind a UPS, so I can disconnect the UPS and connect it to the dedicated outlet without having to shut them down, a few lights and a mini-fridge for things that can perish if not cold (And not just to keep my soda and beer chilled).

I'll take Bill190's suggestion to connect the ground directly on my cold water pipe (same thing used by the electric panel) so there's even less of a link between the generator and normal house wiring.
 
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