Replacing a Plug (Cord Cap) on a space heater?

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Old 12-19-11, 01:24 PM
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Question Replacing a Plug (Cord Cap) on a space heater?

I have an older Delongi Oil filler radiator and the plug burned up because the outlet was not making good contact (Older GFCI, Which I will replace also)
Both the plug and receptacle were noticeably melted on the hot side (However the GFI did not trip and when I pushed the test button now it just buzzes and will now trip the breaker in the 20A kitchen circuit) Anyway is there any tips on how to replace the cord cap on the heater? The heater wire is the high temperature 16 Gauge x 2 conductors and is not grounded
Is there a special way to terminate the cord cap or even a special part brand or model number that I should use? All I can find for heavy duty cord caps are the grounding style which I assume I can't use as the heater has no grounding wire

PS: I don't want to throw out the heater as it still works and it is not one of the ones that are made in China (Made in England) so I rather keep it (Plus it was an expensive heater)

PPS:
The heating system in my house is fine I just use it so I don't have to keep the thermostat so high to save a few $

Thanks
 
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Old 12-19-11, 01:44 PM
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I burnt the plug off my 30+ year old Delongi 2 or 3 times before I got smart and replaced the original cord with a #12 cord set intended for power tools. Been more then 15 years and the plug still shows no sign of over heating.

Don't ask me how I spliced it inside, it's been a long time ago. I think I may have left 2 or 3 inches of the original cord inside and connected with wire nuts but there may be a better way.
 
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Old 12-19-11, 01:48 PM
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One like this is rated 15A...that should be fine for your heater.



And I found this one on the HD website...


Though of course this nullifies the UL rating, we both know its done all the time.
 
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Old 12-19-11, 02:32 PM
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Does a space heater need a polarized plug?
I too found the same caps at HD but alot of them are non polarizing
 
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Old 12-19-11, 02:47 PM
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I can't imagine why? Heaters like that worked for years without them.

Maybe a pro will weigh in with WHY we even have polarized plugs nowadays. I would assume its because older stuff sometimes used the case or frame for the return path?

Yep....per Wiki
"Polarization is maintained by the shape, size, or position of plug pins and socket holes to ensure that a plug fits only one way into a socket. The (single pole) switch of the appliance is then connected in series with the energized wire. For an appliance such as a toaster, putting the exposed heating wires on the neutral side of the switch provides a small measure of extra protection against electrical shock; similarly, lamps with Edison screw bases will connect the screw shell of the lamp socket to the neutral conductor."
 
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