how do i add a ground wire to a two prong outlet?

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Old 12-19-11, 04:43 PM
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how do i add a ground wire to a two prong outlet?

I have a house built in 1942 and the outlets are only two prong. Can I run a ground wire from the electrical box and replace the the two prong with a new three prong and add the ground wire. Could I just run a ground wire to a central location and branch off to the outlets? thanks
 
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Old 12-19-11, 04:50 PM
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Short answer, no. Are you needing the ground for a specific reason or for safety's sake? If the latter, you can identify the first receptacle in a particular circuit and replace it with a GFCI receptacle and install all the downline 3 prong receptacles from the LOAD side of the GFCI, labeling each with the provided stickers "GFCI Protected" and "No Equipment Ground". It would be perfectly legal and would allow you to use 3 prong receptacles. Do that on each circuit and you would be cool. Let us know if you have any questions regarding it.
 
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Old 12-19-11, 04:58 PM
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ok thanks and it is for safety sake, but so I understand correctly I would rund a new wire to a gfi and then run new wire to all the other outlets with a ground attached or can I just run the first one and the rest are automatically gounded without a third wire?
 
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Old 12-19-11, 05:29 PM
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No, all you do is put a GFCI receptacle in the place of the first receptacle, with a "no equipment ground sticker" You run no ground wires. The receptacles downstream get a "gfci protected" and "no equipment ground" sticker.
 
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Old 12-19-11, 05:37 PM
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Yes you may run a ground wire (equipment grounding conductor) from that outlet box with new 3 prong receptacle all the way to the panel with the breaker for that circuit. It may follow the route of the existing power feed cable exactly, approximately, somewhat, or vaguely.

It may daisy chain to other receptacles and items on the same branch circuit.

If this separately run ground wire first reaches a fat ground wire (grounding electrode conductor) between panel and ground rod/water pipe it may end there and be clamped on.

Ground fault circuit interrupters provide additional protection for people. Ground wires provide extra protection for equipment.

New wiring must be grounded, with the ground wire contained in the cable or conduit with the circuit conductors.
 
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Old 12-19-11, 06:27 PM
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It may daisy chain to other receptacles and items on the same branch circuit.
I believe that is some issue of debate. I don't have that section of the code but as I remember reading the code only says it must run all the way back to the main ground. "Daisy chaining" is not mentioned so strict interpretation is each ground must run all the way to the main ground.
 
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Old 12-20-11, 04:19 AM
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250.130 Equipment Grounding Conductor Connections.
Equipment grounding conductor connections at the source
of separately derived systems shall be made in accordance
with 250.30(A)(1). Equipment grounding conductor connections
at service equipment shall be made as indicated in
250.130(A) or (B). For replacement of non–grounding-type
receptacles with grounding-type receptacles and for branch circuit
extensions only in existing installations that do not
have an equipment grounding conductor in the branch circuit,
connections shall be permitted as indicated in 250.130(C).

C) Nongrounding Receptacle Replacement or Branch
Circuit Extensions. The equipment grounding conductor
of a grounding-type receptacle or a branch-circuit extension
shall be permitted to be connected to any of the following:
(1) Any accessible point on the grounding electrode system
as described in 250.50
(2) Any accessible point on the grounding electrode conductor
(3) The equipment grounding terminal bar within the enclosure
where the branch circuit for the receptacle or
branch circuit originates
(4) For grounded systems, the grounded service conductor
within the service equipment enclosure
(5) For ungrounded systems, the grounding terminal bar
within the service equipment enclosure
Informational Note: See 406.4(D) for the use of a ground fault
circuit-interrupting type of receptacle.
 
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Old 12-20-11, 03:44 PM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
I believe that is some issue of debate. I don't have that section of the code but as I remember reading the code only says it must run all the way back to the main ground. "Daisy chaining" is not mentioned so strict interpretation is each ground must run all the way to the main ground.
How would it not be allowed? That's how new circuits are installed.
 
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Old 12-20-11, 06:47 PM
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Originally Posted by drooplug View Post
How would it not be allowed? That's how new circuits are installed.
I think the debate come in when some interpret the grounding to only come from the panel to the first receptacle. After that it would come from the upstream receptacle.
 
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Old 12-21-11, 09:26 PM
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thanks, but the wire is bx cable and the main runs goes to a junction box and the others branch off with only two wires going to each receptacle. would changing the first one with a gfi still work or do I have to change all to a gfi, thanks
 
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Old 12-21-11, 09:38 PM
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If it is newer BX with a bonding strip you already have a ground. Older BX may or may not provide an adequate ground.
would changing the first one with a gfi still work
Yes.
 
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Old 04-10-12, 12:18 PM
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yup that is exactly what you need to do. just dont overload the ground wire for instance if you use a number 12 wire you can share that ground with two or three rooms outlets. if you are using 14 then i would do just one room per ground going back to the panel.
 
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Old 04-10-12, 01:29 PM
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Upstream, meaning anywhere from this panel inside the house to the individual lines in the wall (ie light switches and outlets)?
Strict interpretation of NEC by some is that each device must have its own ground wire all the way back to the panel, no sharing.
 
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