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Replacing range/oven -- need wiring help (aluminum 6 AWG wire from wall)

Replacing range/oven -- need wiring help (aluminum 6 AWG wire from wall)

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  #1  
Old 12-22-11, 04:24 PM
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Question Replacing range/oven -- need wiring help (aluminum 6 AWG wire from wall)

Hello,

I'm replacing my kitchen range and wanted to make sure everything was OK with the electrical wiring.

The new stove is arriving next week, giving me a chance to make any necessary changes.

So... The current setup is as follows. a cord (6 awg 4 wire aluminum SER type) is coming out of conduit in the wall and is wired directly to the old range. Cord from wall has 3 black insulated and 1 uninsulated wire. From the colors on wires of the block on the range (red, white, black) I think I can determine which are hot (red, black), neutral (white) & ground (uninsulated, wired to same terminal as neutral).

Currently, there is a 40-amp 2-pole breaker in the box.

My new range, it appears either requires it to be hard wired, & I assume these are copper wires, or also has an alternate installation for Canada. It appears that the range already has a jacketed set of 4 wires coming out. Since I bought this open box, I am getting US model of the range, I'm not getting a corded version.

see installation instructions at the link below here...

http://www.kitchenaid.com/assets/pdf...%209759536.pdf

My question is as follows.

Am i better off installing a junction box & NMEA 14-50 receptacle (do they make these rated for AL?, will I need some kind of antioxidant?)

or..

Should I splice the cables in a junction box with split bolt connectors or insulated connectors that can handle copper & AL joins?

I'm thinking that the first option sounds better in that I could unplug the range if necessary. Since it's a dual fuel, not sure if this is a safe option?

Also, should I change out the 40-amp breaker for a 30-amp? The instructions seem to call for that, but is that a minimum, or is that necessary to protect the range?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance!
 
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  #2  
Old 12-22-11, 07:40 PM
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I would install the 14-50R receptacle and install a cord on the range that essentially becomes a disconnect. To determine the proper fuse or circuit breaker size, follow the manufacturer's instructions.

A time-delay fuse or circuit breaker is recommended. The
fuse size must not exceed the circuit rating of the range
specified on the model/serial number rating plate located on
the right vertical surface of the oven door frame
.
The circuit breaker required is probably a 40 amp.

Am i better off installing a junction box & NMEA 14-50 receptacle (do they make these rated for AL?, will I need some kind of antioxidant?)
Yes, range receptacles generally will accept either copper or aluminum conductors. Aluminum conductors should have an anti-oxidant applied to the connections. A common one is No-Alox.

Ideal NOALOX 4 Oz. Anti-Oxidant Compound (498101) from The Home Depot
 
  #3  
Old 12-22-11, 09:22 PM
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Smile Thanks!

I jumped the gun and just got back from home depot with a 4x4x2 1/4 box, cable clamp, 3/4" deep cover, 50A CU/AL rated 250 V receptacle/facepate and 50A rated 4 prong plug end, along with a small tube of NOALOX.

4x4 is in and I'm getting to the wiring now. Is there any other prep aside from brushin on the antioxidant/lubricant? (should I hit the AL on the ground wire with a 3M pad, since it's been exposed for many years or will the noalox take care of that? I planned on cutting off 2" or so of the ends to get to some "fresh" wire that's not been exposed to air or crushed in the terminals.)

One other question? I have about 4-5 feet of the 6-3G wire extra. Can I just make a big loop in the wall so I have the extra length if I ever need it? Or is that a bad idea or against code?

Also, Do I need conduit indoors? (this is an interior wall)

Thanks again!
 

Last edited by sam8861; 12-22-11 at 10:02 PM.
  #4  
Old 12-23-11, 06:32 AM
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If you have cable now there should not be a need for conduit, unless subject to damage. Cable in a wall is not considered subject to damage, but should be 1 1/4" from the face of the stud where the drywall would be secured.

The big loop would need to be secured so I see no real advantage.
 
  #5  
Old 12-23-11, 05:02 PM
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Thanks again! You guys advice made this an easy job!
 
  #6  
Old 12-23-11, 06:13 PM
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Have a good Christmas dinner from your new stove.
 
  #7  
Old 12-23-11, 08:37 PM
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(should I hit the AL on the ground wire with a 3M pad, since it's been exposed for many years or will the noalox take care of that? I planned on cutting off 2" or so of the ends to get to some "fresh" wire that's not been exposed to air or crushed in the terminals.)
A 3M pad would work fine, but I prefer to cut back the wire and get "fresh" wire as you mentioned. NoAlox will not remove existing corrosion from wire that has been exposed to the air for a long time as far as I know.
 
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