service wire cut

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Old 12-27-11, 03:42 PM
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service wire cut

We have a cut service wire, that powers a home, made of aluminum. Can it be spliced or does it need to be replaced entirely? It's about 4' from the "in ground provider black plastic box", and the breaker box on the house is 40' away.

Not in a big hurry to replace it, but want to get quotes soon.
 
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Old 12-27-11, 03:56 PM
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It can be spliced using a blue Polaris, but first, what's that
"in ground provider black plastic box"
and is this on the poco or customer side?
 
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Old 12-27-11, 04:25 PM
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It's basically an inground sleeve with a cover. It's on the customer side.
 
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Old 12-27-11, 06:01 PM
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You'll be fine using a blue Polaris connector.
 
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Old 12-27-11, 06:36 PM
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Polaris connectors that Justin is talking about is the brand name of a type of wire splice that is listed for underground, and is also submersible in water. You will not find them at the big box stores, at least that I have seen.

There are other underground splices out there. Bottom line: splicing the wire is acceptable.
 
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Old 12-28-11, 07:21 AM
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Here's a picture of the "black box". What's the correct name?




We are getting quotes today.
 
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Old 12-28-11, 08:46 AM
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That is a hand hole box. .
 
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Old 12-28-11, 04:54 PM
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Looks to me like a Quazite or equivalent open bottom junction box, but appears to be pretty small for service conductors. Have you ever looked in it? It also looks like the lid bolts are 5 sided. There are special sockets made to fit these bolts, usually two sizes fit all boxes.
 
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Old 12-29-11, 02:13 PM
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Would there be any reason, whatsoever, to completely replace the entire line, including breaking up a concrete patio, instead of splicing?

The break is 5 feet, not 4, from the hand hole box, and there is plenty of slack on the lines.

I can't think of a single one, but people are asking

I've tried to explain that there are a ton of wired nuts in every home and the power company doesn't replace miles and miles of wire every time a line breaks.
 
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Old 01-02-12, 01:44 AM
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123.,

That is what we called either hand hole box or quaitze box and I did catch the photo with oddball bolt head which it is a Pentagon bolt and you will need a Pentagon socket and not very many place will carry this socket.

Normally the Pentagon bolt useally reserved to the POCO or other means prevent any unathorized personales to get into there.

The only way they can find the break by two method is TDR { time deomation refactor (sp )} or Megger or using the toner to trace the excat location and dig it down and respice it with proper underground kits.

Merci,
Marc
 
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Old 01-02-12, 08:52 AM
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Would there be any reason, whatsoever, to completely replace the entire line, including breaking up a concrete patio, instead of splicing?

The break is 5 feet, not 4, from the hand hole box, and there is plenty of slack on the lines.

I can't think of a single one, but people are asking

I've tried to explain that there are a ton of wired nuts in every home and the power company doesn't replace miles and miles of wire every time a line breaks.
The only reason to replace the line is you would be 100% sure it will not fail there again. While wirenutted splices are everywhere is a home, they can also fail as can be seen in this forum. Add that your splice will be in the ground with water present and that chance of failure goes up.
Now with that said, as with wirenuts, your chance of a properly done underground splice failing is slim. In your situation I would go ahead and do the splice.
 
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Old 01-02-12, 09:31 AM
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Would there be any reason, whatsoever, to completely replace the entire line, including breaking up a concrete patio, instead of splicing?
I can think of one reason, the cable could be aluminum. If an aluminum splice gets the least amount of moisture in it, it will oxidize and fail. That beng said, I would also try a proper underground splice too using a proper splice kit as Marc stated.
 
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Old 01-09-12, 09:24 AM
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Thanks again for the input guys!
 
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Old 01-09-12, 03:58 PM
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Are you sure that's customer side? That box is awful close to the pole and the fiber pedestal, unless the meter is on the pole?
 
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