New bath electrical


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Old 12-29-11, 11:40 AM
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New bath electrical

I'm running wire for a new bathroom. I have a dedicated 240v for a baseboard heater and another 120v for lights and some wall recepticles. Now I want to run a line for 2 double gfci plugs over the vanity and then continue to run the line to a fan/light/night light unit over the shower. This unit can be placed over the shower as long as its protected by a gfci. The wire from the first gfci to the second gfci will be pigtailed so the second will not be reliant on the first. The fan/light unit will be protected by the second. So a wire coming from the load side will go to the 3 way switch that controls the fan unit. I'm using 12/2 from the fuse box to the first gfci and 12/2 from the first gfci to the second. Can I then run a 14/2 from the second gfci to the 3 way switch then 14/2 to the fan unit? Or do I have to continue with 12/2 to the 3 way switch which controls the fan unit. The fan unit does not have a heater and is a 15 amp unit.
 
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Old 12-29-11, 11:50 AM
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20 amp circuit needs 12 ga wire.
 
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Old 12-29-11, 11:55 AM
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Can I change gfci's to 15 amp and still use the 12/2 with a 15 amp breaker?
 
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Old 12-29-11, 12:12 PM
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Wait for one of the pros to chime in, this may need to be a 20 amp circuit.
 
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Old 12-29-11, 09:56 PM
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I'm definitely not a pro, but I believe it does need to be a 20A circuit. This would mean you have to use 12ga wiring, not 14ga. NEC 210.11(C)(3) states:

Bathroom Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, at least one 20-ampere branch circuit shall be provided to supply bathroom receptacle outlet(s). Such circuits shall have no other outlets.

Exception: Where the 20-ampere circuit supplies a single bathroom, outlets for other equipment within the same bathroom shall be permitted to be supplied in accordance with 210.23(A)(1) and (A)(2).
 
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Old 12-30-11, 06:05 AM
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This needs to be #12 on a 20 amp circuit.
 
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Old 01-02-12, 07:12 PM
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I also thought you would not be allowed to have recepticals and lighting on the same circuit?
 
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Old 01-03-12, 06:04 AM
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You can, so long as they serve the one bathroom only.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 01-03-12 at 11:38 AM. Reason: added one for clarity.
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Old 01-03-12, 03:45 PM
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As others have said, the circuit needs to be 20A and therefore needs to be 12ga wire.

Also, I see no reason in wasting $10 on a second GFI. Of course, there's nothing code-wise wrong with your plan, but there's no reason you can't have one GFI receptacle that protects the downstream receptacle and light/fan
 
 

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