Bathroom Upgrading outlet to GFCI

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-30-11, 06:47 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: PA, USA
Posts: 5
Bathroom Upgrading outlet to GFCI

Hello,

I have an outlet paired with two switches in my bathroom. The outlet is old and I was looking to replace it with a GFCI outlet since it resides right next to my sink.

After taking a closer look, I am now wondering if this is possible? I am attaching a diagram. The orange wire is actually black, but I left it orange so that it stood out a bit.



Thanks for reading,
John
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-30-11, 06:50 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: SE Iowa
Posts: 71
Yes, you can either put the switches on the load side (making the switches GFCI protected) or on the line side.

The bigger question is -do you have enough room in the box to fit a GFCI?
 
  #3  
Old 12-30-11, 07:34 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,365
The orange line is just providing power to the other switches.

The switch loop for the fan is improperly done. The white should not be the switched hot. That should have been a blk/red/white cable going to the fan/light.

You may experience tripping as the neutral current from the fan/light is not going through the GFI.
 
  #4  
Old 12-30-11, 09:44 PM
Justin Smith's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cressona, Pa, USA
Posts: 2,546
You can't do that because all current-carrying conductors will not be in the same jacket.
 
  #5  
Old 12-31-11, 05:36 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,365
There is an exception for non-metallic raceways. The problem will be the missing neutral current from the fan/light.
 
  #6  
Old 12-31-11, 11:02 AM
SeaOn's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 351
Seems to me the power (120v) serves the receptacle first. So you can install a GFCI without protecting the lighting load (If the lighting load is not against code. Example: Fan located in a shower space). Just install all conductors on the line side, and it should work with out tripping. I’m with pcboss, they did terminate the white conductor wrong. It would seem this is a fan/light combination, or they junction the cables somewhere—to serve the light and fan with a grounded conductor.
 
  #7  
Old 01-01-12, 08:56 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: PA, USA
Posts: 5
GFCI conguration

Thanks for the replies, everyone.

So by installing all conductors on the line side of the GFCI, am I correct in understanding that the configuration would look like the following?

 
  #8  
Old 01-01-12, 09:25 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 4,941
I'm by far not an expert, but this seems odd to me. Where is the fan and light picking up their neutral? If the cable into the light/fan box carries a hot, why did they pick up the hot from the outlet cable? If the outlet cable is on a different circuit than the fan/light cable that has the neutral, isn't that a potential hazard?
 
  #9  
Old 01-01-12, 09:58 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,365
Agreed that the wiring shown would be very unusual. If this is two circuits, the power from the receptacle would not be needed. If it is one circuit the neutrals should all be tied together and only the blacks would be switched.

It looks like someone made a mistake and pulled xx-2 when it should have been xx-3 cables.
 
  #10  
Old 01-01-12, 01:24 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: PA, USA
Posts: 5
It is a single circuit

Thanks,
John
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'