1000 feet 120 volt power transmission

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  #1  
Old 01-16-12, 12:29 PM
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Question 1000 feet 120 volt power transmission

Hi everyone, this is my first post on this forum.
My question is about the feasibility of setting up a 120 volt power line from our 10 kW genny to another building on our land, which is about 1000 feet from the genny shed. (we are in Canada by the way)
From what I understand, the wires would need to be something like #4 awg to get a voltage drop of around 3 % with a 4 Amps maximum load (~450 watts) on that distance. I got that off this calculator American Wire Gauge table and AWG Electrical Current Load Limits with skin depth frequencies

1-First off, if the distance is 1000 feet, that means the "roundtrip" distance is 2000 feet. Correct?

2-Are my calculations correct in assuming I would need #4 wire to achieve this?

Any thoughts on this would be much appreciated!
Thank you!

Luke
 
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  #2  
Old 01-16-12, 12:41 PM
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You'd need a minimum of #6 copper. IMO, a small inverter generator converted to LP would be cheaper. (chime in Furd)
 
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Old 01-16-12, 01:34 PM
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Justin,
can you show us how you got to a number 6 Cu?
 
  #4  
Old 01-16-12, 01:45 PM
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My calculator shows a 2.1% drop at 4a on #4.

electrician2.com voltage drop calculator
 
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Old 01-16-12, 02:00 PM
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Using the calculator at the link...seems like 6 is correct if you limit it to approx 3%. 6 would give a 3.25% drop...4 would be right at 2%.

Either way...thats gonna be pricey. 1000ft of either will run a bunch! I see 6/3 UF at $250 for only 125ft. 2 grand just for the cable....I imagine aerial would be similar.
 
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Old 01-16-12, 02:08 PM
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Seems everyone is assuming the OP will be using copper! Best betóto limit cost-- is a #2 Alum for that distance.

Many factors to determine VD, so itís best to up the wire gauge to be safe. Considering VD is smart and the best practice, but not mandatory per NEC.
 
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Old 01-16-12, 02:17 PM
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I based my answer on the numbers he already gave. #4 Al wouldn't even be close to 3%.

Good suggestion on using it if available. Still need to know HOW he plans on running it.
 
  #8  
Old 01-16-12, 03:32 PM
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Without knowing the type of load an answer is almost non-existent. For example, the load could be an incandescent light bulb or a resistance-type heater, both of which will operate quite well with lower voltages making the 3% voltage drop requirement unduly strict.

What is also pertinent is whether or not this is a continuous load.
 
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Old 01-16-12, 03:50 PM
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I'm with Justin. Set a separate Generator at the site and run it off propane. It's not like it's connected to house service or anything. How much use will it get off the 10K gen?
 
  #10  
Old 01-16-12, 04:56 PM
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It's not like it's connected to house service or anything.
How do you know that to be true? All the OP stated was they wanted a line from their existing generator.
 
  #11  
Old 01-16-12, 07:21 PM
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240 volts #10 cu #8 AL VD 2+%
 
  #12  
Old 01-16-12, 08:10 PM
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240 volts #10 cu #8 AL VD 2+%
But he wants 120v.

.....................
 
  #13  
Old 01-17-12, 09:23 AM
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add a 240/120 volt transformer at the end. Lot cheaper that the big wire.
 
  #14  
Old 01-17-12, 09:33 AM
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Or if he just needs lights a deep discharge battery or Coleman lantern.
 
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Old 01-17-12, 11:49 AM
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An exact description of the load and the purpose of the load will most helpful.

Possibly it's a load that could be powered from the battery in a vehicle.
 
  #16  
Old 01-17-12, 12:09 PM
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The OP said 4 Amps (How specifically the OP came-up with this number is still in question). The OP hasnít been back to update us, so repeating the same thing isnít getting us anywhere!!! Just my .0001.
 
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