right way to run a light circuit?

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  #1  
Old 01-30-12, 02:48 PM
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right way to run a light circuit?

Is there a right way to run a light circuit. On a 15amp circuit i will have a bathroom light/switch, exhaust fan/switch, bedroom light/switch,and bedroom 2 light/switch. The power will come from my utility room light. I plan on running that to the bathroom switch then to the light and fan. Then i would run wire from the bathroom switch to the 1st bedroom switch and to the light, then run wire from 1st bedroom switch to 2nd bedroom switch and to the light. Is this the correct way to do it? Useing 14-2 wg wire. thanks for helping.
 
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Old 01-30-12, 02:55 PM
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Are these lights all on the same floor? If so you can run power into each light from the attic (if applicable) and then a switch loop down to the switch that controls each light.

First diagram
DIY Wiring Diagrams for Light Switches | Easy to read diagrams for switch loop, rheostat and combo switch controlled receptacle
 
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Old 01-30-12, 03:00 PM
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these are all in the basement.
 
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Old 01-30-12, 03:05 PM
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If your walls and ceilings are opened, either way will work, power at the switch or at the device/fixture. Whichever uses less wire.

Do you have a floor layout that you can post?
 
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Old 01-30-12, 03:37 PM
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I dont have anything i could post. All the switch boxes are close together it would be a short run from switch box to switch box. Light to light would take more wire. So either way is ok for code? I am more worried about running all the wire then having the inspector telling me to change everything.
 
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Old 01-30-12, 04:08 PM
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Just make sure to keep the cable protected. When drilling through studs, drill your holes dead center. If the hole is closer than 1-1/4" to the edge of the stud you need to put a nail guard plate on the face of the stud so when installing drywall or in the future, hanging shelves or pictures someone doesn't use an overly long nail/screw and pierce the cable. Also when securing the cables to the studs try to keep them in the center of the stud as well.

Here is something I followed when I rewired my entire house. I had to bring all the electrical up to code. Basic Residential Electrical Wiring Circuits Rough In and Codes Guide
 
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Old 01-30-12, 08:27 PM
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drummin89
Just make sure to keep the cable protected. When drilling through studs, drill your holes dead center. If the hole is closer than 1-1/4" to the edge of the stud you need to put a nail guard plate on the face of the stud so when installing drywall or in the future, hanging shelves or pictures someone doesn't use an overly long nail/screw and pierce the cable. Also when securing the cables to the studs try to keep them in the center of the stud as well.

Here is something I followed when I rewired my entire house. I had to bring all the electrical up to code. Basic Residential Electrical Wiring Circuits Rough In and Codes Guide
I looked at the posted link really fast (Lighting fast), and spotted an error. Note: As many are just trying to be helpful, they may not know, or proof read what they present. Just my .01.
 
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Old 01-30-12, 11:50 PM
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As I understand the latest code cycle (or perhaps the next cycle) requires neutral wires at the switch locations. This is because of the necessity of neutral wiring for many "smart" switches now being used in home automation schemes. In my own home most of the switches had power (hot and neutral) run to them when built way back in 1987.
 
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Old 01-31-12, 02:45 AM
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Best bet is to talk to the inspector or a codes official when you go to apply for the permit (if you haven't already), they will know best what they will be looking for when they do the inspection. I had a list of questions that I asked when I went to apply for my permit.

I used that link I posted to get a general idea of what is required, I also checked it against other sources, asking questions on this forum and by talking to local electricians and of course asking the inspector.

Where I live, my municipality actually doesn't use the NEC. I believe the inspector told me they reference the IBC (international builders code) or something like that. He told me just reference the NEC and I'd be fine as they are pretty much the same as far as electrical codes.
 
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Old 01-31-12, 05:53 AM
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I agree with Furd and will add that power to the switch would include the neutral. Using a switch loop would require 3 conductor+ground to satisfy the neutral at switch requirement.
 
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