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Changing the furnace switch to a combination switch and outlet

Changing the furnace switch to a combination switch and outlet

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  #1  
Old 02-05-12, 09:01 AM
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Question Changing the furnace switch to a combination switch and outlet

Hello,
I want to install a Sanuvox UV light in the duct on top of my furnace. My problem is that I don't have an outlet close by to plug it in. Next to the furnace I have the switch that turns the power on/off to the furnace.

My idea is to replace that switch with a combination switch and outlet (Leviton T5225) and plug the light there. I'd like that when the switch is off (turning off the furnace unit), to also turn off the power to the outlet.

First, does this break the code?

Second, how do I wire the new outlet. The current switch has two black wires connected and a ground connection. Inside the box there is also a couple of white wires twisted together (see picture).


So is the following wiring to the new combo switch/outlet correct? (

1) Ground connection to the green screw in the lower right.
2) One of the black wires to the top left gold screw.
3) The other black wire to the top right black screw.
4) Leave the tab on in the T5225 so that the switch also controls the outlet.
5) Pig tail a white wire to the left silver screw.

Thanks in advance.
 
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  #2  
Old 02-05-12, 10:17 AM
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Welcome to the forums! My first concern is that you have a toggle switch to turn the furnace on and off. Is there no thermostat?? What happens if you turn it on and go to work?
What you have described is not against code and will work. Just concerned about the switch.
 
  #3  
Old 02-05-12, 10:17 AM
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How many watts or amps does the light draw? What does the furnace require? What is the rating of the circuit?
 
  #4  
Old 02-05-12, 10:40 AM
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My first concern is that you have a toggle switch to turn the furnace on and off. Is there no thermostat??
I understood it to mean this is the 120 volt disconnect at a gas furnace. I was just assuming there would be a thermostat somewhere up in the house. If this is the case, I believe the outlet is required for servicing the furnace and needs to be GFCI protected. I think I would interrupt the circuit before it gets to this switch location and install an outlet closer to the location of the UV light.
 
  #5  
Old 02-05-12, 12:31 PM
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I think this is the emergency/servicing switch for the furnace that disconnects the transformers, relays, blowers, fuel pump, etc.

If this receptacle you wish to install is in an unfinished basement, utility room, laundry room, etc., it needs GFCI protection.
 
  #6  
Old 02-05-12, 12:47 PM
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chandler, there is thermostat in the house. The switch I'm referring to is the emergency switch that just cuts the electricity to the furnace. The switch is always in the on position unless the furnace is being serviced once a year.

pcboss, the light draws 17 watts, so it's not that much. I'm not sure about the furnace, but I checked my breaker panel and confirmed it has it's own 15 circuit breaker in there for the furnace.

casualjoe, the light is next to the switch.

Thoughts?

Thank you very much for your help.
 
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Old 02-05-12, 12:53 PM
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Gotcha, never had that where we live. If it is isolated for the furnace, I'd say the wiring is good, but as the others alluded to it may need GFCI protection, and the only real way to do that would be a GFCI breaker on that circuit.
 
  #8  
Old 02-05-12, 01:45 PM
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and the only real way to do that would be a GFCI breaker on that circuit.
Or a blank face GFCI or a GFCI switch which would provide the receptacle he needs.
 
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Old 02-05-12, 03:57 PM
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casualjoe, the light is next to the switch.

Thoughts?
Ok, my thought is this. Typically the switch at a gas furnace is installed in a handy box. I think I'd replace the handy box with a 1900 box and install a GFCI receptacle next to the switch with a raised 2 gang cover so I could have a protected receptacle without the switch being protected. I wouldn't want my furnace on a ground fault protected switch because of the possibility of a nuisance trip.
 
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