Moved: Welder question

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-18-12, 11:22 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 2
Moved: Welder question

Im wiring a welder with a 50 amp draw. I need #6 wire but the plug only has 3 wires and no bare wire. There is a green the serves as the ground in the plug. Should I get 6-3 or 6-2 w ground?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-18-12, 11:26 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 2
Question....Im wiring a welder with a 50 amp draw. I need #6 wire but the plug only has 3 wires and no bare wire. There is a green the serves as the ground in the plug. Should I get 6-3 or 6-2 w ground?
 
  #3  
Old 02-18-12, 11:35 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 12,277
It is always to start your own post rather then attach your question to another post.

All the welders I have seen use only 240 volts therefore you do not need a neutral. You only need 6-2 with ground (two hots and the ground wire)
 
  #4  
Old 02-18-12, 02:31 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 44,190
I have the same type of welder and I think I used 8-2 copper [maybe it was 6, I wired it almost 20 yrs ago] One thing to consider though is how long you expect your welder to last. If I'm not mistaken all the new welders have a 4 prong plug. Using 4 wire would mean you'd only have change out the receptacle if you had to buy a new welder.

I'm not an electrician but I think this is correct

Mod note: Not a welding expert but I can't see a reason why a welder would need both 120v and 240v. Can you provide a cite on that?
 
  #5  
Old 02-18-12, 05:02 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 12,277
Mod note: Not a welding expert but I can't see a reason why a welder would need both 120v and 240v. Can you provide a cite on that?
I have not seen any welders that need a 4 wire circuit but that doesn't say they are not out there. (Maybe some TIG's?) The only reason that they would need a neutral is maybe some of the electronics are only 120v similar to an oven. Back in the day, ovens only need 240 volts, but then they started to add more and more electronics which was putting current on the ground wire. Not good!

#8 is OK for 50 amps if it is wired using THHN in pipe. If your using a cable then you need #6.
 
  #6  
Old 02-18-12, 05:59 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,041
O/t but I have always believed dryers and stoves have 120v components because they are also made in gas versions. Basically you have a 120v appliance that can have either electric or gas heat sources. That way they don't have to make two totally different appliances with different parts. With a welder though there won't need to be two different versions so you can use a 240v power supply for the electronics and a 240v motor on a cooling fan.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes