Gas Range power usage

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Old 03-02-12, 10:44 AM
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Gas Range power usage

Hello Everyone. I'm in the planning stages of a kitchen renno. I plan to add circuits and rewire the one that is already there, so I'm looking at power consumption of my new appliances. I can't seem to find any estimate for power usage for a gas range. I'm assuming it would not be too high. Basically just the glow bar and the convection fan are electrical. I just want to make sure. Thanks in advance
 
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Old 03-02-12, 11:39 AM
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Well, a Maytag convection oven I googled needs a 15a circuit.
So, I'm guessing that is all that is needed. BUT, you should know ahead of time if the equipment you buy has different specifications on electrical requirements (like, a built in microwave or some other sort of thing that might require a 20a circuit). Find out what you will have and google it on the mfg's site; the manuals are there with the info.
 
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Old 03-02-12, 12:23 PM
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Right, I'm just trying to figure out if I need a separate dedicated circuit for the range or if I can just tie into another line. The range I'm looking at says 15 or 20 amp line. Doesn't tell me how much of the 15 or 20 it will use.
 
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Old 03-02-12, 03:20 PM
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Consider running cable suitable for an electric range - 6 or 8 AWG. (6-3G or 8-3G should have black, white, red, and bare ground.) Make sure it's got a white conductor (black or red can't be re-identified as a neutral on 6 AWG or smaller).

Terminate on a 20A breaker at the load center and a 5-15R at the range, although in a box suitable for a range receptacle. 4-11/16 box I suppose, although you should do the math. You will have to use smaller pigtails to terminate on the 5-15R and maybe on the breaker as well. Insulate and store the spare conductor.

In this way, you can switch to an electric range when you or future occupants get that fusion reactor online.
 
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Old 03-02-12, 04:32 PM
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It really depends on the range. A "typical" gas range is rated at about 1.5A (and uses much less), so it is typically added to the lighting circuit or another nearby circuit. But like everything else, ranges are getting more and more features and may require more power. With a convection fan, it shouldn't require much more... but there are some with electric warming drawers, etc.

The specs of the range should really tell you how many amps/watts are required. I wouldn't guess and have to redo it.
 
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Old 03-02-12, 04:48 PM
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I agree with Zorf.. I believe your manufact recommends a dedicated 15A circuit, but I would go 20 amps. A typical gas range can be served from one of the kitchen counter top receptacle circuits. But, as mentioned, todays appliances have changed greatly. In the future, they will have wireless connectivity. Currently you can turn on a coffee pot from work (Smart home). It just depends.
ArgMe, made a good point regarding future plans.
 
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Old 03-03-12, 11:48 AM
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re power for a gas range

Hi
The electrical code for Ontario, Canada allows the receptacle for a gas range and the receptacle for the eating area to be on the same 15 Amp circuit...nothing else. This tells me that the requirements for a gas range aren't really that demanding (the clock, fan, lights, and igniters). If it was my kitchen, I'd seriously consider making that circuit a 20 Amp just so I can make toast at the table and not have my breakfast interrupted to reset the circuit breaker.
 
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Old 03-03-12, 01:34 PM
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The OP is not in Canada, but in Pennsylvania. Canadian code does not apply here.
 
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Old 03-03-12, 01:52 PM
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A typical gas range can be served from one of the kitchen counter top receptacle circuits.
I had the understanding that a typical gas range could be supplied by any circuit EXCEPT the 20A countertop circuits. Admittedly, I'm not a code expert though...
 
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Old 03-03-12, 10:04 PM
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I had the understanding that a typical gas range could be supplied by any circuit EXCEPT the 20A countertop circuits. Admittedly, I'm not a code expert though...
Glad you admitted that…LOL
See NEC 210.52 (B)2
 
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Old 03-03-12, 10:46 PM
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As Seaon posted:

(2) .....The two or more small-appliance
branch circuits specified in 210.52(B)(1) shall have no
other outlets.
Exception No. 2: Receptacles installed to provide power
for supplemental equipment and lighting on gas-fired
ranges, ovens, or counter-mounted cooking units.
.................................
 
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Old 03-04-12, 02:38 PM
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Thanks SeaOn and Ray for the clarification and correction!
 
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