Wire size kitchen remodel

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Old 03-04-12, 10:40 AM
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Wire size kitchen remodel

Do I need to put a ref. on it's own circuit, I know microwave over stove need it's own circuit put should I use 14/2 or 12/2 wire? how many plugs to a circuit? thanks for the help.
 
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Old 03-04-12, 10:59 AM
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There is no limit in a residential circuit how many receptacles can be on the circuit. Good design would consider the expected loading of the circuit.

The refrigerator does not need a dedicated circuit unless the instructions call for one. Sub-zero will probably call for a dedicated circuit. The circuit can be 15 or 20 amp.
 
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Old 03-04-12, 12:03 PM
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You need a minimum of 2) 20A GFCI protected circuits for the counter. (wired with 12-2g or 12-3g) The fridge is permitted to be on one of these circuits, but nothing else. There's no limit on the amount of receptacles, but I'd try to limit it to 2 or 3 duplex-style.
 
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Old 03-04-12, 02:29 PM
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As others have stated, most typical refrigerators do not require their own dedicated circuit, but I would always wire them with a dedicated 15A (14/2) circuit. I wouldn't want the circuit running the fridge to trip every time you turn on the coffee pot or other high-draw appliance.
 
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Old 03-05-12, 05:12 AM
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Thanks for the help what is the g at end of wire size? I have never seen that before. Probably just never noticed it.
 
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Old 03-05-12, 06:00 AM
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The g stands for the grounding conductor. So 14-2 w G would have the two insulated conductors plus the grounding conductor.
 
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Old 03-05-12, 05:16 PM
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Thank you that is what I had guessed but nice to be sure.
 
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Old 03-05-12, 05:17 PM
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Thanks for the help what is the g at end of wire size? I have never seen that before. Probably just never noticed it.
There was a time when you could buy 12-2, 14-2, 14-3, 10-3, 8-3 NM cable with or without a ground and then it was important to specify when you wanted the ground. Today all non-metallic cables come with a ground.
 
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