Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Electrical, AC & DC. Electronic Equipment and Computers > Electrical - AC & DC
Reload this Page >

Help me Remove an Outlet Wired to Dimmer Switch so it is Always Hot

Help me Remove an Outlet Wired to Dimmer Switch so it is Always Hot

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-04-12, 05:38 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 20
Help me Remove an Outlet Wired to Dimmer Switch so it is Always Hot

I have an outlet in my living room that has both receptacles wired into a dimmer switch. The dimmer switch controls that outlet as well as two sets of track lighting. The dimmer switch only has one set of wires coming into the box so I think I need to rewire the receptacle but I am not sure what to do.

The attached image shows how the receptacle is currently wired. I have a couple sets of neutral and hot wires coming in and as you can see one hot wire and one neutral wire are tied together.

What I want to happen is to have the track lighting still wired to the dimmer switch but the receptacle to always be hot. Help me out.

 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-04-12, 05:58 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,662
Do I see a wire nuted white not connected to any thing? Is there another black some where? Can you tell us the wiring at the track light?
 
  #3  
Old 03-04-12, 06:06 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 20
I am not sure how it is wired at the track light.

I have one black wire and one white wire stabbed into the recp. and one black wire and one white wire wire nutted together. Those are the only wires int he box besides a ground. The dimmer switch it is wired to only has one white and one black that is why I was wondering if I can change anything at the recep.

here is another angle

 
  #4  
Old 03-04-12, 08:04 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: U.S.
Posts: 30
Mode note: Contents redacted because I'm not sure the advice is safe. Un-redacted copy archived.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 03-04-12 at 09:21 PM.
  #5  
Old 03-04-12, 09:13 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,662
The problem is we know power doesn't come in at the switch if there is only a single 2-conductor cable and black and white on the switch would indicate a switch loop. The black connected to a white at the receptacle would also indicate a switch loop but if there are only two cables at the receptacle one would be for the switch loop and the other either power in or power to the light. If you assume the second cable is power in then how does power get to the light. If the second cable is not power in but power out to the light then where is your power in cable. That is why we must know the wiring at the light. We do not have enough 2-conductor cables for it to work and no evidence of any 3-conductor cables.
 
  #6  
Old 03-05-12, 02:51 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
Double check at the switch, too, to make sure there are no capped and tucked wires in the back. If so, a pix of that will help. Like Ray, I don't see how it would work. BUT, you must get that receptacle off the dimmer, as it violates code practices.
 
  #7  
Old 03-05-12, 04:56 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,361
X3 for not enough cables are shown.

X2 for the dimmer controlling the receptacle is a code violation.
 
  #8  
Old 03-05-12, 11:31 AM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: U.S.
Posts: 30
After being sensored, I realize my advice should have included safety. Sorry... It is my therory that the dimmer is fed hot through the black/white joint. This could be safely confirmed with a meter. Disconnect the black and white after determining they are hot and check the dimmer or receptacle for voltage. If that feeds the dimmer, simply splice in a pig tail to the black/white joint and make the recp hot directly, doing away with the switch leg by capping it off. However, after rereading original thread, I'm also thinking a splice has been made somewhere other than these two boxes[dimmer-recptacle] inorder to control trak lighting. A trip into the attic [if possible] maybe required.Always be careful Mike and good luck.
 
  #9  
Old 03-05-12, 11:40 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,662
It is my therory that the dimmer is fed hot through the black/white joint.
Yes but the problem is how does the switched power get to the light if that is true. There just aren't enough cables to explain it. I did consider that but kept coming up one cable short as confirmed by two other mods.

My reply below your post I removed:
The problem is we know power doesn't come in at the switch if there is only a single 2-conductor cable and black and white on the switch would indicate a switch loop. The black connected to a white at the receptacle would also indicate a switch loop but if there are only two cables at the receptacle one would be for the switch loop and the other either power in or power to the light. If you assume the second cable is power in then how does power get to the light. If the second cable is not power in but power out to the light then where is your power in cable. That is why we must know the wiring at the light. We do not have enough 2-conductor cables for it to work and no evidence of any 3-conductor cables.
 
  #10  
Old 03-05-12, 12:47 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 20
Thank you for all the input! I will do some more investigating tonight and call a friend of a friend who is a master electrician. I thought this was a quick fix type question but I am over my head. I do know that the representations I made are correct.

There are only two sets of wires coming into the recep. and only one set coming down to the dimmer and that two sets of track lights are tied into this circuit. My house was built in the 70's ( i just moved in) and my guess is that someone with my set of qualifications did some of the wiring.

I bet that there is a junction box in the attic that has a splice feeding the lights. My attic is a real tight space with about 30+ inches of blown insulation and I might just have to call in a pro.

Thanks for all your help. I wish this was easier to solve.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'