Is this GFCI too close?

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  #1  
Old 03-05-12, 11:21 AM
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Is this GFCI too close?

Is this too close to the faucet? I did not measure before I finished the wall off

 
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  #2  
Old 03-05-12, 11:45 AM
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No code violation.

........................................
 
  #3  
Old 03-05-12, 12:17 PM
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Just kinda ugly/odd looking....

Is the plate trapped behind the countertop or is it just the picture?


If you want opinions...personally...I'd fix it somehow.
 
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Old 03-05-12, 03:04 PM
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You'll get tired of it being there. Like Vic said, it is odd and ugly looking for such a fine vanity set up. If you can move it, I would do it.
 
  #5  
Old 03-05-12, 06:46 PM
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Echo: Re-do it ... I would put one receptacle at each outside edge of the vanity. Given the wide basins, maybe 1" in from the edge and at least 6" above.

If you want a more finished look and that wall is deeper than a standard 2x4, check out the recessed covers from TayMac: TayMac Corporation

I would also consider putting a receptacle "below deck" so you can put a toothbrush charger in the drawer.

As you know it's pretty easy to sit out here and say "re-do it" because I don't actually have to do the work. It goes like this for me: I put in all this work, got it done, and now just have to add the finishing touches. There is, however, a small flaw which is not a code problem. I can fix it now, which can be mentally exhausting to even think about, or I can just finish everything and let it go. Then every day while brushing my teeth, etc. I can think about it. For as many years as necessary. And then tear even more stuff apart to fix it. So as they say, I pay now, or pay later. Or, would you like your pain up front, or on the installment plan? Or, maybe you've got bigger fish to fry.

Best to you. I hope you're both getting pedicures so those toe kick lights will properly highlight the results.
 
  #6  
Old 03-06-12, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
Just kinda ugly/odd looking....

Is the plate trapped behind the countertop or is it just the picture?


If you want opinions...personally...I'd fix it somehow.
Its literally just touching the countertop. I dont like the way it looks either but I was more concerned with safety. That wall will be covered with backsplash tile. My house has aluminum wireing so extending the wire out of that workbox could be a challenge. Also, I have wired a workbox 2 ft below the one you see in the photo. It powers the accent lighting below. I was considering just mudding up the one you see in the photo and just using a small power strip mounted in the in the vanity drawer. As long as its safe. Thoughts?
 
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Old 03-06-12, 11:32 AM
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LOL.. nice. I never thought of those lights to display our well manicured feet

Your point hit the nail on the head. This is the "next phase" of the bath project and it's the finish work that "hurts" from thinking too hard about it. Its good to know I am not the only one with the same thoughts racing through my head.

Originally Posted by ArgMeMatey View Post
Echo: Re-do it ... I would put one receptacle at each outside edge of the vanity. Given the wide basins, maybe 1" in from the edge and at least 6" above.

If you want a more finished look and that wall is deeper than a standard 2x4, check out the recessed covers from TayMac: TayMac Corporation

I would also consider putting a receptacle "below deck" so you can put a toothbrush charger in the drawer.

As you know it's pretty easy to sit out here and say "re-do it" because I don't actually have to do the work. It goes like this for me: I put in all this work, got it done, and now just have to add the finishing touches. There is, however, a small flaw which is not a code problem. I can fix it now, which can be mentally exhausting to even think about, or I can just finish everything and let it go. Then every day while brushing my teeth, etc. I can think about it. For as many years as necessary. And then tear even more stuff apart to fix it. So as they say, I pay now, or pay later. Or, would you like your pain up front, or on the installment plan? Or, maybe you've got bigger fish to fry.

Best to you. I hope you're both getting pedicures so those toe kick lights will properly highlight the results.
 
  #8  
Old 03-06-12, 03:13 PM
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You can't "mud" up a box with active wiring in it. You will first need to abandon the wiring by cutting it too short to use from both ends. But if I understand you correctly, the top receptacle feeds the bottom one, in which case you must leave it exposed and accessible.
 
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Old 03-06-12, 07:43 PM
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... That wall will be covered with backsplash tile. My house has aluminum wiring so extending the wire out of that workbox could be a challenge.
Yep, I guess that depends on where your feed is coming from. I'm not sure if it would be worth the trouble but somebody may make an access panel that you could set tile into, so the panel would sit flush with the rest of the wall, and you could hide the box behind that panel.

Otherwise if that section is going to be tiled over anyway, depending on your stud locations, it might not be all that painful to just cut out the sheetrock, re-do your electrical, and re-hang.

... I was considering just mudding up the one you see in the photo and just using a small power strip mounted in the in the vanity drawer.
As already mentioned you can't just mud it over. Also in most jurisdictions I believe you must have a GFCI-protected receptacle accessible within a given distance from each basin. I don't recall that distance offhand. Maybe somebody else could comment on whether an under-counter, concealed recep would meet that requirement. I doubt it.

But I do love the toe-kick lights. Are they LED strips, or what? I might like to add something like that as a nightlight.
 
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Old 03-06-12, 07:52 PM
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It looks like you may have a code problem anyway. You're required to have a GFCI receptacle within 3' of each basin. That one looks too far away, unless you have another one out of view to the right. Relocating it between the two basins would solve the problem from a code perspective but would severely limit you in use.
 
  #11  
Old 03-07-12, 10:03 AM
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Originally Posted by ArgMeMatey View Post
But I do love the toe-kick lights. Are they LED strips, or what? I might like to add something like that as a nightlight.
They are two "puck" halogen spotlights from ikea. I would do LED and may convert these to led in the future.
 
  #12  
Old 03-07-12, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Msradell View Post
It looks like you may have a code problem anyway. You're required to have a GFCI receptacle within 3' of each basin. That one looks too far away, unless you have another one out of view to the right. Relocating it between the two basins would solve the problem from a code perspective but would severely limit you in use.
Really? Or am I misunderstanding this? I "need" to have a gfci receptacle 3' from each basin? What if I dont have any? The vanity is 55" so I think I meet that, closely with the way things are, unless I need to measure from the center. Let me know, I havent made any changes yet because I have not had time.
 
  #13  
Old 03-07-12, 03:13 PM
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Originally Posted by muddust View Post
Really? Or am I misunderstanding this? I "need" to have a gfci receptacle 3' from each basin? What if I dont have any? The vanity is 55" so I think I meet that, closely with the way things are, unless I need to measure from the center. Let me know, I havent made any changes yet because I have not had time.
In order to meet code you need to have one within 3' of each basin. I don't know if you pulled a permit or not for this project but if you did and the inspector notices it, it won't pass inspection. If you didn't pull a permit you don't have any problems until you get ready to sell and then it may or may not be a problem depending on if it's the list or not. There obviously many things done they did not meet code but my personal feeling is everything should be done to code.
 
  #14  
Old 03-07-12, 04:16 PM
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I didn't read the entire thread, but I saw Aluminum wire mentioned. What's up with that?
 
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Old 03-07-12, 07:01 PM
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One receptacle can satisfy the code if it is within 36" of each bowl.

GFI receptacles are not listed for use with aluminum wiring.

I would try to get rid of the aluminum wiring before tiling the backsplash.

The code would now require a 20 amp circuit for the bathroom receptacles.
 
  #16  
Old 03-07-12, 07:22 PM
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Too many fires historically. Years ago, that's one reason 'trailers' (mobile homes) were considered D-traps. The real problem arose where making a connection with a non-aluminum conductor (i.e. copper connection). If great care wasn't taken and an anti-oxidant used, that connection would create a hazard oftentimes starting a fire so even though aluminum is cheaper, preference is for copper.
 
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Old 03-08-12, 09:17 AM
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I was just waiting to see how long it would take for someone to see the word "aluminum wiring". That is an entirely different thread yet to be posted by me. FYI, I have all of my alum pigtailed to copper with anti corrosion grease. I am planning on replacing with copper or at least reterminating with alumiconn (google it) connectors as they are saftey certified and my insurance company covers the use of them. Until then, I have inspected 90% of the pigtail terminations for any "wear or burnout". I woory too much about things so please try not to give me a stroke

Back to the original thread, I decided to eliminate the top gfci show in the original photo as the source wire was fed from below. So, I meet 36" from each basin, its just the question of wether or not being beow the basins are code or not. I am not going to worry about this too much. I did something simillar in my last house and it was never an issue.

Here are the results so far, need to pull the vanity then mud things up.


 
  #18  
Old 03-08-12, 09:52 AM
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In dwelling units, not less than one 20A, 125V receptacle outlet must be installed within 3 ft from the outside edge of each bathroom basin [210.52(D)]. The receptacle outlet must be located on a wall or partition adjacent to the basin counter surface, or on the side or face of the basin cabinet not more than 12 in. below the countertop [210.11(C)(3)]. One receptacle outlet can be located between two basins to meet the requirement, but only if the receptacle outlet is located within 3 ft of the outside edge of each basin. The bathroom receptacles must be GFCI-protected [210.8(A)(1)].

Here's your answer with the appropriate code references.
 
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Old 03-08-12, 10:03 AM
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Muddust...if that outlet inside the vanity is the only one....no way! I mean...you can probably have one there...but why? If you are just using it to feed another one...you could just make your connections there and put a blank cover on it I think. And you have to have one accessible above.
 
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Old 03-08-12, 02:34 PM
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This graphic in the link should clear things up along with the code text posted above.

From Mike Holt.

MikeHolt.com
 
  #21  
Old 03-08-12, 02:41 PM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
This graphic in the link should clear things up along with the code text posted above.

From Mike Holt.

MikeHolt.com
Good diagram but I don't see how the area indicated complies with 210.11(C)(3) which says the outlet cannot be more than 12" below the countertop (top of the basin in your diagram).
 
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Old 03-08-12, 02:58 PM
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I have all of my alum pigtailed to copper with anti corrosion grease.
How did you pigtail. Regular wire nuts are no longer approved. They must be specially approved for the purpose.
 
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Old 03-08-12, 04:05 PM
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The Op did say they were going to use the Alumiconn connectors from King Innovations. These are like a set screw terminal block.
 
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Old 03-08-12, 04:39 PM
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Missed that. Thanks for the correction.
 
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Old 03-08-12, 04:51 PM
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MS, that was the latest graphic I could find. I believe the 12" requirement came later than that graphic. Thanks for noting this.
 
  #26  
Old 03-09-12, 04:43 AM
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I decided to eliminate the top gfci shown in the original photo as the source wire was fed from below. So, I meet 36" from each basin, it's just the question of whether being below the basins are code. ... I did something similar in my last house and it was never an issue.
At my house that would have a WAF of approximately -10 (Go sleep in the basement).

Would it meet current NEC requirements to have receptacles mounted in the wood sides of the vanity? Looking back at the basin design, there might be enough room for a 1-gang remodeler box at the back of the vanity. That would mean adding an extension ring, coming out the sides, and, to provide enough clearance, probably adding a perpendicular surface mount box for the receptacle where the transformer is plugged in now.
 
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Old 03-09-12, 05:05 AM
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The receptacle could be mounted in the side of the cabinet facing outwards.
 
  #28  
Old 03-09-12, 06:46 AM
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As a final "Code" approved solution I am going to add an outlet to the left of the vanity, just 2" below the counter top. This will satisfy 36" outside edge from both sinks. Though we will probably use the outlet below the vanity mostly. Thanks to everyone that helped out here. I hope my next thread is as helpful.
 
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