Extending power from a power conditioner to another room

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Old 03-29-12, 03:52 PM
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Extending power from a power conditioner to another room

I'm wiring my basement and one of the rooms will be used for a home theater. Most of the audio equipment will be in a closet and run off a surge protector/power conditioner. I want the bluray player and wii outside of the closet on a different wall so I don't have to run into the closet to put in a movie.

It would be easy enough to put receptacle next to the bluray player and wii but I'd like them to get their power from the surge protector/power conditioner in the closet. My initial thought is to put a receptacle in the closet and one next to the other components with 12/2 NM connecting them - no power source, just a wire connecting the two receptacles. Then I'd plug a male to male cord from the output of the power conditioner to the receptacle in the closet which will then give power to the receptacle near the bluray and wii.

I don't like the idea of using a male to male cable and the whole thing feels a little klugey. Can you suggest a better way to do this?
 
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Old 03-29-12, 03:57 PM
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No, two otherwise dead receptacles and power on a male plug don't sound like a great idea. Have you thought of installing a whole-house surge protector/power conditioner in your panel?
 
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Old 03-29-12, 04:08 PM
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The suicide cord is non code compliant and should never be used. I would suggest, as Nashkat did, a whole house surge protector in the panel. How far distant from the existing power surge protector is the apparatus you plan on using?
 
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Old 03-30-12, 07:14 AM
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Thanks for the responses guys. As I was describing the male-male cable I started realizing how dangerous it would be if one end had power...

I'll definitely look into the whole house surge protector, that seems like it will solve my problems.
 
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Old 03-30-12, 09:08 AM
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Whole-house surge protectors are panel-specific. You'll need to have the manufacturer and the type of panel that you have to choose the one that'll work for you. That information should be on the label inside the panel cover door.
 
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Old 03-30-12, 06:28 PM
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Whole-house surge protectors are panel-specific. You'll need to have the manufacturer and the type of panel that you have to choose the one that'll work for you. That information should be on the label inside the panel cover door.
Huh???? They would be panel specific if they are the type that plugs onto the loadcenter's bus like a circuit breaker, but most of the better whole house suppressors I have seen mount outside the loadcenter and wire into a 2 pole circuit breaker. This is the type I prefer.

Amazon.com: Cutler Hammer CHSPT2ULTRA Single Pole UL1449 3RD Edition Type 2 SPD: Everything Else
 
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Old 03-30-12, 10:27 PM
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I agree with CasualJoe. That's the unit I have in my home. I also installed one in my sister's home and on one of the panels at the historical museum where I volunteer.
 
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Old 03-31-12, 08:26 AM
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They would be panel specific if they are the type that plugs onto the loadcenter's bus like a circuit breaker, but most of the better whole house suppressors I have seen mount outside the loadcenter and wire into a 2 pole circuit breaker. This is the type I prefer.
Yes, you're right, I should have said "Whole-house surge protectors which snap into the panel in a two-pole breaker position are panel-specific."

That said, I haven't used those in any residential apps. Thus far, I've only used the panel-mounted ones for two reasons. One is that they tend to be a better value - only costing 50 - 70% of the one you linked to. Plus that's all you have to buy. No nipple, no box, no cover, no mounting hardware.

The second reason is that they install by simply removing and replacing the panel cover and deadfront. That's huge, IMO, when the service is mounted flush in drywall, and installing a device in a separate box would require re-working that drywall, often in a finished space, and mounting the box flush, with a removable, and visible, blank cover for access.
 
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