Wiring a GFI in a two gang box setup

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  #1  
Old 04-02-12, 01:18 PM
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Wiring a GFI in a two gang box setup

I have a two gang box outlet in a bathroom and need to put a GFI on one side to protect the outlets. This is in a circuit, so I have a wire coming into the gang box and one going out. I am unsure how to wire the outlets so that the GFI will protect both outlets and then provide power going out of the box to the next outlet. I am sure you can tell by my terms, but I am very novice so any specific instructions would be very much appreciated. Thanks
 
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Old 04-02-12, 02:32 PM
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A GFI recepacle has a "pair" of "LIne" terminals and a "pair" of "Load" teminals--- the Black and White conductors of the "Feed-in" cable connect to the "Line" terminals-- the Black & White conductors of the "Feed-out" cable connect to the "Load" terminals.

You must be certain that the Black conductors & White conductors connect to the correct terminals , Blacks to the "Black" terminals and Whites to the "White" terminals.
 
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Old 04-02-12, 07:25 PM
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I'm hearing part of your question as "Where do I connect the wires that provide power to the next outlet?" The answer to that question is "It depends on what the next outlet, and all other outlets, down the line are doing."

If all of the outlets down the line are in locations that need GFCI protection, then you connect that pair to the LOAD terminals, along with the jumpers for the second receptacle in your two-gang box. This would be the case if, for example, there's only one more outlet being fed by that cable and it's in another bathroom. But if any of the down-line outlets are in locations that don't need GFCI protection, then they are connected with the feed-in wires to the LINE terminals.
 
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Old 04-03-12, 07:50 AM
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Just to make sure I am understanding correctly, if the other outlets down the line do NOT need GFI, I can then connect the incoming line and outgoing line together on the "LINE" side of the GFI and then have jumpers coming out the "load" side of the GFI to the second outlet in the two gang box. Is that correct? This way, both outlets in the box will be GFI protected? What is the best type of "tester" to have in order to find which incoming wire is the "hot" wire from the junction box? Thanks
 
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Old 04-03-12, 08:14 AM
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Just to make sure I am understanding correctly, if the other outlets down the line do NOT need GFI, I can then connect the incoming line and outgoing line together on the "LINE" side of the GFI and then have jumpers coming out the "load" side of the GFI to the second outlet in the two gang box. Is that correct? This way, both outlets in the box will be GFI protected?
Yes.

What is the best type of "tester" to have in order to find which incoming wire is the "hot" wire from the junction box?
A simple non-contact voltage tester will tell you that. I use a Greenlee; some folks prefer to use one from Klein.

You'll also want to have a GFCI tester to check that everything is working properly after you're done.
 
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Old 04-03-12, 08:43 AM
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I will respectfully disagree with Nashkat1 on the best type of tester for a beginner. Non contact testers can give false positives. I would recommend a cheap analog multimeter. If you get a digital you need to get a brand name since the cheap ones can be affected by induced voltages.
 
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