Ground Up or Ground Down....

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  #1  
Old 04-02-12, 02:51 PM
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Ground Up or Ground Down....

I mostly see the receptacles with Ground Up in commercial installs.

Do you subscribe to the happy face upside down rule as a extra rule of thumb.

While not code, for example, Hubbel has designed their surge outlet with the intent of the ground facing up. Their *writing* on the face for alarm, etc - to be read in the correct position is with the receptacle with the ground facing up.

I'm sure theres opposing views - plugs coming out, ground to be the last to come out as well....
 
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Old 04-02-12, 03:13 PM
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If the "direction" of the prongs of a cord -plug form a "right-angle" with the "dirction" of the line-cord of say a refrigerator or window AC unit , and if the Grounding prong of the cord is below the two Line-prongs of the cord , then it's best that the Grounding slot of the receptacle be "down" so the line-cord falls straight-down from the receptacle.
 
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Old 04-02-12, 03:25 PM
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While this is a taboo topic on most forums:NO NO NO:, I usually install the ground up as if something falls on it, it won't short across the prongs.
 
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Old 04-02-12, 07:44 PM
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It makes no difference and is strictly personal preference; it isn't addressed in the NEC.
 
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Old 04-02-12, 08:13 PM
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When I mount a receptacle vertically, I mount it with the ground down unless there's some reason not to. The opposite of PATTBAA's example - if the cord enters the plug at a right angle and the ground prong is opposite the point where the cord enters it - is one example of where mounting with the ground slot up makes sense.

Here are a couple of my reasons for doing it the other way. For one, the ground slot was added to the formerly standard two-slot receptacles below the existing slots when one of those receptacles was mounted in its "normal" position, with the neutral on the left. So to me it just looks and feels natural that way.

Besides that, I just don't buy the safety argument that Justin made for mounting with the ground up: "if something falls on it, it won't short across the prongs." Do we care if something shorts across the prongs? That should immediately trip the OCPD. For there to be any real hazard from the ground-down orientation, then, a conducting object would have to contact the hot prong without also contacting the neutral prong. How likely is that? Especially since the neutral prong on polarized plugs is wider than the hot prong, and therefore sits further up the wall in that orientation.

Now, just to add some fun, which way do you mount a horizontal receptacle - ground left or ground right? Anyone?
 
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Old 04-02-12, 08:42 PM
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I mount them without the ground
 
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Old 04-03-12, 01:55 PM
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Now, just to add some fun, which way do you mount a horizontal receptacle - ground left or ground right? Anyone?
To the left, with the T being upside down.
 
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Old 04-03-12, 03:08 PM
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Yep, ground left, T upside down on a 20A.
 
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