Missing ground rod

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  #1  
Old 04-10-12, 05:45 PM
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Missing ground rod

I've been a realtor for many years and recently had something new come up on an inspection for one of my buyers. Home was built in the late 90's and has an in-ground pool that was added after build. Inspector noted that there was proper bonding to the foundation of the pool and pool equipment, but that he couldn't find any external ground rod. Code experts: Is a ground rod needed if there is bonding to the pool foundation rebar? If so, it wouldn't be a big deal to add, but I don't want to negotiate the repair with the seller if it isn't needed.

Doug M.
 
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Old 04-10-12, 06:37 PM
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Not an expert on pools, but we need more information. Are you saying there is no grounding electrode(s) (Rod) at the pool panel, or is the inspector saying there is no rod for the pool bonding grid. Also, what section of the code are they claiming is non-compliant (Note: If they didn’t supply one, then ask for one). Note: A rod is not needed for the pool bonding grid. Also, what type of inspector. If you are saying a home inspector, then they have no authority, and you should have an electrical contractor (Note: Find a contractor who has experience with pools) inspect the grounding, and bonding of the pool. Side note: If the pool was installed without an electrical inspection, I wouldn't step foot in it, or around it, until it can be verified safe!!
 
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Old 04-10-12, 06:45 PM
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A rod tied to the pool bonding grid is not needed.

If this is about a grounding electrode for the panel there may be issues. Clarification is needed.
 
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Old 04-10-12, 06:53 PM
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If you are saying a home inspector, then they have no authority, and you should have an electrical contractor (Note: Find a contractor who has experience with pools) inspect the grounding, and bonding of the pool.
I would agree 100% with that statement. Although they have no authority and many are lacking credentials to be inspecting the electrical aspect of anything, they can squash a sale very easily with a simple statement in their report to the potential buyer. You may have to pay a good contractor to inspect the grounding and bonding of the pool, but it would be money well spent.
 
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Old 04-10-12, 07:09 PM
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I would agree 100% with that statement. Although they have no authority and many are lacking credentials to be inspecting the electrical aspect of anything, they can squash a sale very easily with a simple statement in their report to the potential buyer. You may have to pay a good contractor to inspect the grounding and bonding of the pool, but it would be money well spent.
Very true, that’s why a qualified electrical contractor is needed. He can shut him or her up quick!!! Some home inspectors will recommend the owner, or buyer have an electrical contractor inspect what they believe is an electrical code violation. Honestly, it seem like a home inspector is a waste of money for certain portions of their inspections.
 
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Old 04-10-12, 08:02 PM
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Sorry, should have been more clear... The inspector pointed out that there is no ground rod for the main electrical panel (or he was unable to locate it), but that he was able to locate a bond connection to the pool foundation. I am hoping the bond to the pool foundation might take the place of a separate ground rod. Functionally it seems like it would perform the same function of equalizing potential between the electrical system and the earth and the large pool foundation would seem the path of least resistance even if there was a separate ground rod, but is it generally acceptable practice and/or code compliant?

Inspector discussion is a separate thread in a different forum

Doug M.
 
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Old 04-10-12, 11:06 PM
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-Not going to get into rather you have ground rods or not. Best thing to do is install two rods. Installing two is idea, but not required. Two are required if a
single electrode consisting of a rod does
not have a resistance to ground of 25 ohms or less. Where multiple
rod electrodes are installed to meet the requirements
of the NEC, they shall not be less than 6 ft apart.
-The bonding grid and the grounding system are two separate things. Install the rods at the main service, and be done with it. Also, the ground rod (the supplemental
electrode) shall be permitted to be bonded to the grounding
electrode conductor, the grounded service-entrance conductor,
the nonflexible grounded service raceway, or any
grounded service enclosure per code.
-Note: The pools bonding grid should not be connected to the service panel grounding bar. Although technically it is.…………………
***Wait for others, as they may have more info..
 
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Old 04-12-12, 10:20 AM
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You may have a CEE (Ufer) used at the house. This is an electrode in the building footer and connected to the panel.

Sounds like the inspector did not follow the GECs leaving the panel to see where they went.
 
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Old 04-12-12, 08:36 PM
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You may have a CEE (Ufer) used at the house. This is an electrode in the building footer and connected to the panel.

Sounds like the inspector did not follow the GECs leaving the panel to see where they went.
Exactly. This is why I said this:
-Not going to get into rather you have ground rods or not. Best thing to do is install two rods.
 
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Old 04-13-12, 05:22 AM
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If there is already one present, why would you install two more? I say follow the electrode conductor.
 
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Old 04-13-12, 09:07 PM
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While it would not hurt to supplement a CEE, there is no need or code requirement for a supplemental electrode.
 
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Old 04-14-12, 08:51 AM
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Seems we are talking to ourselves. No one knows what the OP has. All we know, is that they “may not” have one or two rods. It’s obvious we know the code!! I believe we should wait on the OP--if they even need us further.
 
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