Service Entrance Help Needed

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  #41  
Old 04-20-12, 05:24 PM
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Yeah they had examples of what most houses use for each portion and I used those and entered the square footage and it came out to 85 amps. Im pretty sure a 200 amp box will cover it. You would have to be an idiot to think a 200 amp box wont cover this house it is only about 1300-1400 square feet.
 
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  #42  
Old 04-24-12, 01:31 PM
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I ran into a new problem. I got the disconnect and everything is hooked up. I got SEU cable from weatherhead to the meter socket and then to the main disconnect. I got SER cable to run from the disconnect to the panel box but the way we had to run it was SEU through the bottom of the disconnect and SER through the top. I talked to an electrician while I was at home depot (not one of the workers just come guy who was buying something) and he said this is no problem. The problem is, no where in the entire city of Cincinnati do they sell the weather tight connector for SER cable and I cant find anywhere the top where you connect that to.

The electrician at home depot said you could make a hole in the plate either with a knock out tool or a hole saw bit and as long as we find a way to feed the cable through and make it tight as well as water proof it then we should be good. Using a regular romex connector wouldnt work. Anyone have any idea on what to do?

I have pictures too but I dont know how to put them on here. Anyone know how i do that?
 
  #43  
Old 04-24-12, 01:36 PM
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  #44  
Old 04-24-12, 01:53 PM
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  #45  
Old 04-24-12, 03:03 PM
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I know I seem to be harping on conduit but if you used conduit no problem with weather seals and as a bonus it would look a lot neater.
 
  #46  
Old 04-24-12, 03:19 PM
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If we used conduit or pvc would be have to go all the way to the panel box or could we end it just inside the house? and what size would you recommend for 4 ought 4 wire SER cable?
 
  #47  
Old 04-24-12, 03:41 PM
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If we used conduit or pvc would be have to go all the way to the panel box or could we end it just inside the house?
PVC is conduit. Use your choice of rigid or Schedule 80 PVC. A hub, a short nipple, an LB, another nipple long enough to get into the first stud bay of the wall where your panel is mounted. Put a bushing on the last nipple and pull your cable into the panel.

While you're running conduit, use it to sleeve the cable between the meter socket to the disconnect. Not just for looks but to protect the cable (and the kid) from what might happen when the kid decides to whack the cable with a tire iron or an aluminum baseball bat. I'd be shocked (yeah, I know) if your jurisdiction doesn't require it.

Nice pictures! Thanks.
 

Last edited by Nashkat1; 04-24-12 at 04:23 PM.
  #48  
Old 04-24-12, 03:42 PM
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If you used conduit or even SER as you did I'd have put the main cut off to one side or below the meter socket using a nipple between the two. That way you wouldn't have an unprotected un-fused cable running across the wall. From the disconnect you would run conduit across the wall to the box and use an CB el into the back of the box. In the conduit you would run three 4/0 THHN and one #6 copper ground.
 
  #49  
Old 04-24-12, 04:54 PM
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The problem is, no where in the entire city of Cincinnati do they sell the weather tight connector for SER cable and I cant find anywhere the top where you connect that to.
You are asking for the wrong type connector and the Big Box stores certainly can't help you. What you should do first of all is install a Myers Hub in the top of the NEMA3R raintight disconnect enclosure. Probably need a 1 1/2" thread. Into the hub you install a cord grip body (CGB), properly sized for the bushing to fit the O.D. of the SER cable. The bushing in the CGB makes the connection raintight, but as with all weatherproof connectors, add a small amount of duct seal around the cable. You could do all of this easier if you avoided the top of the enclosure and exited through the side in which case you could use a 2" romex connector and some silicone. To find a CGB large enough, try checking electrical supply houses who sell industrial supplies such as tray cable.
 
  #50  
Old 04-24-12, 05:18 PM
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Not trying to rip because I know it is done in many parts of the country, and I know your installation is likely perfectly legal, but SE cable strapped to the outside of a house makes me want to cry.
 
  #51  
Old 04-24-12, 09:23 PM
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Not trying to rip because I know it is done in many parts of the country, and I know your installation is likely perfectly legal, but SE cable strapped to the outside of a house makes me want to cry.
I agree 100%!!! This was the same thing I said when I went to visit relatives in MI.. When i seen the cable strapped to their house, I cried wolf!! But, it was acceptable in their neck of the woods (I guess). Seems unsafe to me, and unprofessional. I decided to keep my mouth shut when I seen the pictures posted!! But, if itís acceptable, oh well!!!
 
  #52  
Old 04-24-12, 09:42 PM
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And I have to add you defeated the whole purpose of the disconnect when you placed it 10 feet from the meter. Might as well just use a main breaker in the inside panel. I know we seem to be piling on you but we are just trying to help you do the best possible job.
 
  #53  
Old 04-24-12, 10:04 PM
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I prefer Ray's layout: mount the disconnect next to the meter socket and feed it through a short nipple. Then run conduit over to where you need to enter the wall, use an LB to do that, and run your cable that's now carrying fuse-protected power through that.

The only thing I'd do differently than Ray is that I would definitely use the SER cable to connect the disconnect to the panel. Then you wouldn't need to run the conduit all the way to the panel - just into the inside wall.
 
  #54  
Old 04-24-12, 11:18 PM
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The only thing I'd do differently than Ray is that I would definitely use the SER cable to connect the disconnect to the panel. Then you wouldn't need to run the conduit all the way to the panel - just into the inside wall.
If it was a standard stud wall but the OP said the 2X4s were flat rather then on edge giving only a 1-1/2" wall space.
 
  #55  
Old 04-25-12, 07:27 AM
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If it was a standard stud wall but the OP said the 2X4s were flat rather then on edge giving only a 1-1/2" wall space.
You're right. But the OP also said they'd decided to mount the panel instead in an inside wall which has standard stud depth - if I recall correctly. It's just that the interior wall tees into the outside wall some 10' away from the meter socket and the panel location is more than 3' away from the exterior wall. Thus the need for the outside disconnect and the run of cable along the outside of the house. But that also means that they don't need to run the conduit all the way to the panel.

And boy, are you right when you say
you defeated the whole purpose of the disconnect when you placed it 10 feet from the meter. Might as well just use a main breaker in the inside panel.
I just wanted to underscore that.
 
  #56  
Old 04-25-12, 09:55 AM
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Nash, I'm concerned about sharp 90į turns with SE. That is is why I suggested using THWN and going in to the back of the main panel.
 
  #57  
Old 04-25-12, 11:24 AM
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I'm concerned about sharp 90į turns with SE. That is is why I suggested using THWN and going in to the back of the main panel.
Ray, I'm hearing that now. Might heat up pretty good, especially with stranded 4/0 Al. Hm.

BTW, if I'm hearing their design correctly, the wall the panel will be in is at a right angle to the back of the meter socket and it's an interior dividing wall, so they'll be coming into the top, bottom or side of the panel. FWIW.
 
  #58  
Old 04-25-12, 04:43 PM
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Not trying to rip because I know it is done in many parts of the country, and I know your installation is likely perfectly legal, but SE cable strapped to the outside of a house makes me want to cry.
I also have to agree with you, but it is perfectly acceptacble by the NEC and is frequently done in a competitive bid environment and especially so in subdivisions. For myself, it's conduit and copper THHN/THWN and no SEU cable anywhere in or on my house.
 
  #59  
Old 04-25-12, 07:29 PM
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For myself, it's conduit and copper THHN/THWN and no SEU cable anywhere in or on my house.
I agree. When I renovated a house for us awhile back, we fed separate conductors from the weatherhead on, including to two subpanels.
 
  #60  
Old 04-25-12, 07:55 PM
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Tolyn never said the SEU wasnít allowed.
 
  #61  
Old 04-25-12, 08:09 PM
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Tolyn never said the SEU wasnít allowed.


Nor did I, nor did I say he did. I was agreeing with him on strongly preferring THHN or THWN.
 
  #62  
Old 04-25-12, 08:15 PM
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was responding to this:
but it is perfectly acceptacble by the NEC and is frequently done in a competitive bid environment and especially so in subdivisions.
Regardless, everyone agrees that itís accepted in some areas. Just seems non-compliant for us on a different land
 
  #63  
Old 04-26-12, 05:44 AM
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You could do all of this easier if you avoided the top of the enclosure and exited through the side in which case you could use a 2" romex connector and some silicone.
Only problem with that is the only side knock outs are at the bottom of the box. And in our county if you want to make new knock outs in a box you must have written permission from the manufacturer and give it to them before doing so.
 
  #64  
Old 04-26-12, 06:24 AM
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Only problem with that is the only side knock outs are at the bottom of the box. And in our county if you want to make new knock outs in a box you must have written permission from the manufacturer and give it to them before doing so.
Very strange rule since most places that is common practice but since the majority here agree a conduit mast with in a hub on top is a good way a moot point.

<Opinion> I wonder if the inspectors try to discourage home owners from doing their own work with rules they wouldn't impose on licensed electricians. </opinion>
 
  #65  
Old 04-26-12, 05:29 PM
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Only problem with that is the only side knock outs are at the bottom of the box. And in our county if you want to make new knock outs in a box you must have written permission from the manufacturer and give it to them before doing so.
This would be a local issue with the local AHJ. There is nothing in the NEC, as far as I know, that would support this restriction, but as we all know, the local AHJ may by ordinance enact such restrictions.
 
  #66  
Old 04-26-12, 08:43 PM
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<Opinion> I wonder if the inspectors try to discourage home owners from doing their own work with rules they wouldn't impose on licensed electricians. </opinion>
Iím sure there is a lot of truth to this. One thing that kills me, is the fact that electrical inspectors are doing side jobs, when the law in our state prohibits it. Yet, will slap an electrician with a fine for doing work without the proper licensing.
 
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