Can I add on to a RV pedestal?

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  #1  
Old 05-21-12, 06:35 PM
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Can I add on to a RV pedestal?

I'm in Socorro, New Mexico and I live in an unincorporated area of the county.

Let me preface this question by saying that I am not qualified to work on electrical, and I have no intention of doing it. I am asking my question because we only have a few contractors around here, and most of them are shady and do whatever will work rather than doing whats correct. I just want some knowledge so I can make sure my contractor isn't taking me for a ride or violating code.

I bought some property to do some farming a couple years ago. At the time, I just had a travel trailer there-no other buildings. I brought in electrical from a pole (through the electric company) and had an electrician install a pedestal box. The box has a 20 amp GFCI outlet, a 30 amp outlet, and a 50 amp outlet. My travel trailer plugs into the 30 amp outlet. Each outlet has it's own circuit breaker.

Now I have a little pumphouse about 200' away that houses a surface centrifugal pump. Currently I have an extension cord from the GFCI outlet in the RV pedestal directly to the pump. I only run it when I'm there and nearby. My pumps pulls 5.4 amps, and I'd like to be able to also run a light and a small tv, but nothing more.

Obviously this is not ideal and I want an outlet in the pumphouse. So, here's my question:

Can an outlet be run in series from the GFCI outlet in my pedestal to the pumphouse? Or, do I have to sacrifice the GFCI outlet in the pedestal and have romex run directly from the 20 amp circuit breaker currently servicing the GFCI outlet? Or, can none of this be done and I just need to have a real panel installed? I don't plan more expansion of the electrical for several years...

Any help is VERY appreciated. Thanks!!
 
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  #2  
Old 05-21-12, 07:59 PM
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Yes, you can run another receptacle off the LOAD side of the GFCI. That way the entire circuit would be protected and you would only have to dig 12". You could also run it off the line side but then you would have to dig 18-24" and install GFCI protection at the pump.

At a load of 6 amps, your 200' of #12 wire (20 amps) is just under 5% Any more than that you might want to up it to #10 copper wire.
 
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Old 05-21-12, 08:34 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

Can an outlet be run in series from the GFCI outlet in my pedestal to the pumphouse? Or, do I have to sacrifice the GFCI outlet in the pedestal and have romex run directly from the 20 amp circuit breaker currently servicing the GFCI outlet?
Yes, as TI said, you can connect a feeder for the pumphouse to the LOAD terminals of your GFCI receptacle, noting what he said about conductor size.

But here's the thing: You can't use "romex" - Type NM-b - to do that. Type NM-b cable is only approved for use indoors. You can use Type UF-b cable buried not less than 12" because it is GFCI protected. Or you can use conduit with individual conductors pulled through it. If you use the Type UF (Underground Feeded) cable, it will need to be protected by a conduit sleeve when it is not in the ground - from the GFCI breaker down to 12" below ground, and from 12" below ground up to the receptacle in the pumphouse.
 
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Old 05-21-12, 09:12 PM
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WOW good advice and really FAST! How can I be sure he uses UF-b? Is it printed on the side of the cable jacketing? Is it better to have it in conduit for the whole run?
 
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Old 05-21-12, 10:28 PM
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Yes, it will be on the jacket. If you see paper filler it is not UF cable. In UF cable the wires will look embed into it. Like the sheath was melted and poured around the wires.

 

Last edited by ray2047; 05-21-12 at 11:01 PM.
  #6  
Old 05-22-12, 08:50 AM
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Is it better to have it in conduit for the whole run?
Only single conductors (Type THWN for outdoor installations) should be installed in a full conduit run. Cable should only have a protective conduit sleeve where it is subject to being damaged, i.e., above ground.
 
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