Do all outlets in laundry room need to be GFCI

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Old 05-23-12, 03:03 AM
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Do all outlets in laundry room need to be GFCI

First time using the site hope I'm in right place for my situation.

Here goes, I''m renting an apartment where my washer and dryer is in a 3x3 closet in the master bedroom in fact it is the only closet in any of the bedrooms . There is a outlet visable with nothing pluged into it and, it is not GFCI. I am unable to pull the unit out to see what type of outlets the units are plugged into because the closet door would have to be removed. There is a circuit breaker in the bedroom but the washer and dryer are not running off that breaker so I'm concernened with a possible fire/safety hazzard. The apartment has had a CO issued but it is my belief that this was not inspected because the unit was not in this closet when I looked at the apatrtment , It was in one of the other bedrooms. Sears had to come out for an issue with dryer and advised me that the vent hose running from dryer to main vent hose is made of plastic which is out of code there is a more than 20 ft run to the outside vent,and there is no light in the closet. I told the landlord what the sears tech said and the landlord says the tech did not know what he was talking about.

Another issue is that my smoke detectors are are hard wired into his smoke detectors so when he burns food upstairs my smoke detectors go off. I questioned him about this and he said that he wired them that way for extra percaution. Well,does anyone see a problem here ? Sorry about the lenghty letter I thought the details would be important. Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 05-23-12, 06:53 AM
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I don't believe GFCI outlets are an issue for that installation, but I'll defer to the electricians.
As for the smoke detectors, I guess you need to start fixing yourself some midnight snacks for a week or two.

The dryer exhaust duct you describe is definitely NOT to code. Your landlord is the idiot.

Here is an excerpt from the 2009 IRC (The version currently in use here):

(BEGIN excerpt)
M1502.4 Dryer exhaust ducts. Dryer exhaust ducts shall conform
to the requirements of Sections M1502.4.1 through
M1502.4.6.
M1502.4.1 Material and size. Exhaust ducts shall have a
smooth interior finish and shall be constructed of metal a
minimum 0.016-inch (0.4 mm) thick. The exhaust duct size
shall be 4 inches (102 mm) nominal in diameter.
M1502.4.2 Duct installation. Exhaust ducts shall be supported
at 4 foot (1219 mm) intervals and secured in place.
The insert end of the duct shall extend into the adjoining
duct or fitting in the direction of airflow. Ducts shall not be
joined with screws or similar fasteners that protrude into the
inside of the duct.
M1502.4.3 Transition duct. Transition ducts used to connect
the dryer to the exhaust duct system shall be a single
length that is listed and labeled in accordance with UL
2158A. Transition ducts shall be a maximum of 8 feet (2438
mm) in length. Transition ducts shall not be concealed
within construction.
M1502.4.4 Duct length. The maximum allowable exhaust
duct length shall be determined by one of the methods specified
in Section M1502.4.4.1 or M1502.4.4.2.
M1502.4.4.1 Specified length. The maximum length of
the exhaust duct shall be 25 feet (7620 mm)from the connection
to the transition duct from the dryer to the outlet
terminal. Where fittings are used, the maximum length
of the exhaust duct shall be reduced in accordance with
Table M1502.4.4.1.

(NOTE: The maximum length is reduced by amounts contained in the table for each bend. - TLDOUG)

M1502.4.4.2 Manufacturer’s instructions. The size
and maximum length of the exhaust duct shall be determined
by the dryer manufacturer’s installation instructions.
The code official shall be provided with a copy of
the installation instructions for the make and model of
the dryer at the concealment inspection. In the absence of
fitting equivalent length calculations from the clothes
dryer manufacturer, Table M1502.4.4.1 shall be used.
(END of excerpt)
 
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Old 05-23-12, 07:17 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

Do all outlets in laundry room need to be GFCI
No. No outlet in a laundry room is required to have GFCI protection. Any receptacle located within 6' horizontally from the nearest edge of a laundry sink is required to have GFCI protection, regardless of where that sink is located.
 
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Old 05-23-12, 07:34 AM
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The biggest issue is the plastic dryer duct. The length and the spirals will cause lint to build up which will cause longer drying times and could lead to a fire. The plastic will melt instead of containing the fire.
 
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Old 05-23-12, 12:21 PM
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Thanks a lot guys you've helped a lot
 
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Old 05-23-12, 12:41 PM
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Thank you for letting us know.
 
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Old 05-23-12, 07:40 PM
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No outlet in a laundry room is required to have GFCI protection. Any receptacle located within 6' horizontally from the nearest edge of a laundry sink is required to have GFCI protection, regardless of where that sink is located.
What do you typically do if the laundry sink is right next to the washing machine. Wouldn't that make the washer receptacle within 6' horizontally from the nearest edge of the laundry sink?
 
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Old 05-23-12, 08:25 PM
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CJ, sounds like it would need GFI protection.
 
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Old 05-23-12, 10:18 PM
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Yep, CJ, I agree with PCBoss. A receptacle in that location needs GFCI protection - whether it's for the washing machine the dryer of the iron.
 
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