Over Heating Desk Fan

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Old 05-29-12, 03:40 PM
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Over Heating Desk Fan

I recenly bought a small 6" brass blade single speed antique GE desk fan and the wiring was worn out. I had to remove the rotor to get to the area where the wires were connected and I thinlk I crushed both carbon brushes when I reinstalled the rotor because I forgot to remove them when I removed the rotor. I purchased some replacement carbon brushes and when I plugged the fan in it is a little noisy and it is overheating (smoking).

What can I can do to eliminate the overheating?

Thank you
 
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Old 05-29-12, 05:47 PM
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Might just need to wait for the new brushes to "burn in." That is, to become shaped to the rotor.
 
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Old 05-29-12, 06:24 PM
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It could be that the fan was originally discarded because of the overheating problem. I don't know how old you are but I am old enough that I remember when such fans were common, not antiques. Back then they ran so hot that if you were to touch the motor after it had been running for a while you risked a serious burn. If someone over-oiled the bearings it could be the oil burning from being in contact with the motor windings.
 
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Old 05-29-12, 09:05 PM
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I plugged in the fan when I got it and even with the power wires barely hanging on it worked and was quiet. I ran it for an hour today and I would have thought the brushes would have worn in by now. I put directed another fan on the back side of the little fan when it was runnung and it kept it cool.

I did oil it but I would have thought it would have burnt off as hot as it got.

I hate to take it apart again because I can't get the brushes out of the fan and I will probably destroy them again at a cost of $15 /pair.

Any additional ideas on how to stop the overheating?

Thanks
 
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Old 05-29-12, 09:08 PM
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I hate to take it apart again because I can't get the brushes out of the fan...
How did you get the old crushed brushes out and the new ones in?
 
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Old 05-29-12, 09:29 PM
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I found the brushes in small pieces when I was reinstalling the rotor. I bought the kind of brushes that have a wire and spring attached but they wouldn't reach the rotor so I cut off the wire and spring and used the small springs that were originally in it that look like a spring from a ball point pen.

I just slid both brushes down the small openings in both sides of the motor. One of the plastic caps that originally held in the springs/brushes in had been replaced with a metal tire air valve cap so I found another one so both caps would match. The guy at the motor repair shop where I got the brushes said he "thought" the caps would be okay to use. I don't suppose the caps could be causing the overheating??

Than you
 
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