Garage Outlet for Refrigerator Question

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  #1  
Old 06-07-12, 11:04 AM
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Garage Outlet for Refrigerator Question

I need to install a dedicated circuit to the garage for a fridge. Plan on a 20 amp with 12/2 w/G wire.

Does this outlet need to be GFCI?

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Old 06-07-12, 11:17 AM
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Yes it needs to be GFCI. If this is detached garage and already has power to it you can not run a second power supply.
 
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Old 06-07-12, 11:53 AM
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Every receptacle in the garage has to be GFCI, it's that simple.
 
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Old 06-14-12, 12:30 PM
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My only concern is a GFCI strictly for the fridge, if it trips and were not home, we lose a lot of food.
 
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Old 06-14-12, 07:49 PM
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Check which code cycle you are on. Pre 2008 code cycle, it was allowed to put a simplex receptacle in a garage without GFCI protection. Your state/local city may also have amended the current NEC.

However, the loss of food is no excuse for somebody getting electrocuted.
 
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Old 06-15-12, 04:44 AM
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Definitely check with your local authority. We also have to have all gfi's in the garage but the local inspector will allow one non gfi outlet if he's convinced that it is for a fridge/freezer only.
 
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Old 06-15-12, 09:59 PM
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I've seen twist-lok receptacles used for a fridge before.
 
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Old 06-15-12, 11:26 PM
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I've seen twist-lok receptacles used for a fridge before.
Altering the cord set would probably violate the UL listing and might void any guarantee.
 
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Old 06-15-12, 11:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand View Post
Check which code cycle you are on. Pre 2008 code cycle, it was allowed to put a simplex receptacle in a garage without GFCI protection. Your state/local city may also have amended the current NEC.

However, the loss of food is no excuse for somebody getting electrocuted.
How is it any more dangerous than a 'generally inaccessible' receptacle in a kitchen for the range or fridge? Or the receptacles next to the water supply for the washer? We have really reached the point where NEC mandates are getting out of control. I'd be willing to bet that nobody has ever been electrocuted by their garage refrigerator. But I'd also be willing to bet that thousands of dollars worth of food has been ruined due to GFCI/AFCI nuisance trips. AFCIs have no proven history of preventing fires, and there is no point in having a GFCI in a place that rarely if ever sees moisture. They are simply mandating profits for the device manufacturers.
 
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Old 06-16-12, 06:35 AM
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There have been cases where the insulation has broken down and the frame was energized but at a level too low to trip the breaker.

The NEC considers a concrete floor to be a grounded surface and the potential exists for a path between someone opening the refrigerator and the floor.

The usage of receptacle in a kitchen is somewhat more defined. I don't think too many would pull out the frig in use an extension cord whereas in the garage it is more likely with the usage of tools.
 
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