Narrow breaker panel

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  #1  
Old 06-09-12, 07:07 PM
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Narrow breaker panel

Hi folks,

I recently discovered that I have a Zinsco sub-panel. I want to replace it with a new panel and breakers.

One distinctive thing about this panel is that circuits connect to breakers only from the right side. The panel is only 11" wide and is positioned between two studs in a short hallway.

I know I can cut out a bigger hole, put in a header and use a wider panel, but I was hoping for an easy way through this panel-swap project.

The panels I have seen so far all have two columns of breakers and naturally are wider than 11".

Do any of you know of some narrow breaker panels? Preferably with copper busses!

Thanks,
Lynnx
 
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  #2  
Old 06-09-12, 07:59 PM
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All the main breaker panels I have seen are designed to be installed between 16" spaced studs (14 1/2" wide) You could surface mount the panel (not put it in the stud space)
 
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Old 06-10-12, 01:54 AM
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Are you sure those two particular studs are 12" OC? It's entirely possible that it's a standard 16" stud cavity that was shimmed/blocked out to accommodate the narrow panel. Got a stud finder?
 
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Old 06-10-12, 07:56 AM
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Are you sure those two particular studs are 12" OC? It's entirely possible that it's a standard 16" stud cavity that was shimmed/blocked out to accommodate the narrow panel. Got a stud finder?
I have to agree with Matt. It's not just possible, but probably exactly what has been done. 16" on-center studs have been a standard since Hector was a pup.
 
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Old 06-10-12, 08:33 AM
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Well it was 24" when I was a pup and Zinscos were the bees knees but definitly need to be checked out.

If it is an interior non load bearing wall I wouldn't bother head. Just install a new stud at the needed distance and cut the old one.
 
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Old 06-10-12, 08:37 AM
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If the panel is immediately adjacent to a door or window it could easily be a narrow stud bay. It would also be mighty poor workmanship to have installed it there. OR maybe the door or window (if one) was added after the panel.
 
  #7  
Old 06-10-12, 12:44 PM
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Exactly, it could be any of these scenarios.. That's why OP needs to get a stud finder and see what's going on.
 
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Old 06-10-12, 04:18 PM
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Well it was 24" when I was a pup
I remember in the 70s there was a big push to go to 24" on center, but as I recall, it only caught on when using 2X6 or thicker walls. The code authorities didn't buy the 24" argument back then from what I remember. Other than that, I suppose interior partitions in some areas may have been framed 24" on center. As technology changes, there are different ways of framing and building with different new materials that come available. Aluminum wiring was one that didn't pan out too. And then there was the infamous polybutylene plumbing. Do you remember wood foundations? Haven't heard any more on that one in a long time.
 
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