Help needed by home-owning Noob, re: appliance outlets

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  #1  
Old 06-15-12, 06:46 AM
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Help needed by home-owning Noob, re: appliance outlets

Hello,

My first time posting on this forum.

We moved into our new home in November and the previous owner had a European (Miele) washer-dryer set in the basement, so he had 220v outlets installed. During a storm, we had a bit of a power surge and the motor motherboard of the washer got fried.

So we're replacing the washer and dryer with American-brand appliances.

Should we get an electrician in here to convert the outlets to regular American 110 outlets? Is it an unnecessary expense, and should we just get a couple converters?

Bonus question: the washer-dryer hookups are in the basement bathroom. Why would, in a power surge, the washer get fried, but not the other things in the bathroom presumably on the same circuit (lights, for instance)?

Thanks in advance!
 
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  #2  
Old 06-15-12, 06:52 AM
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What kind of dryer is it (gas, electric)?
Electric dryers are 220/240V.
Are you sure it was a euro dryer? The frequencies are different between there and North America.

I suspect it was a North American electric heated dryer which means you do not require any wiring work and should be able to plug a new dryer directly in where the old one was.

The washing machine would be 110/120V however.
 
  #3  
Old 06-15-12, 06:55 AM
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As for your bonus question.... All electronics are different. I've seen stuff plugged into the same outlet and one item go, and the other one continue working. It all depends on the component and if it was it's time to go.

Prime example, we had our Wii power supply go thanks to a brown out a month or two ago. The stereo receiver was plugged into the same power bar and it was not effected. Both where in use when the brown out happen.
 
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Old 06-15-12, 06:56 AM
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Assuming this really was set up for European appliances, you should get an electrician out to change the outlets for the new ones.
 
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Old 06-15-12, 07:00 AM
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Assuming this really was set up for European appliances, you should get an electrician out to change the outlets for the new ones.
Any thoughts on the 50/60hz frequency shift if it is a European appliance?

I know if it was a small appliance (tv for example), a power converter (transformer and support components) would have to be incorporated into the appliance wiring.

This is kind of why I am thinking it's a NA electric dryer.
 
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Old 06-15-12, 07:07 AM
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That's the reason I said "assuming" - we're both on the same page thinking there would be problems with the frequency difference and therefore these may well have been NA appliances in the first place.

Thus, my suggestion of an electrician if they really were European, as the set up there now to allow for that might be kinda complicated.
 
  #7  
Old 06-15-12, 07:16 AM
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Hey Guys

Thanks for all the discussion - I'm learning and its really helpful. I've attached a photo of the wall socket (there's 2 of them, exactly the same configuration) and the plug on the old dryer (which is the same exact plug on the washer as well).
 
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Old 06-15-12, 07:20 AM
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sorry i didn't answer this - electric dryer
 
  #9  
Old 06-15-12, 07:45 AM
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Although I can't read the markings on the outlet, I've never seen a residential washing machine (in North America) be anything but 110/120V so my hopes of it not being a Europian unit are looking dim.
Have you searched online for the make/model of the washer/dryer?

The kicker now is it could be the unit or the power adjustment equipment.

My suggestion (if it was me) would be to replace the washer and dryer with North American models and have an electrician make the required changes/install of the plugs for you. If these are truely Europian equipment, you might have issues with sourcing parts later down the line and/or finding someone that can work on the.
 
  #10  
Old 06-15-12, 08:05 AM
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just inspected the plugs on both machines - they say 125/250v...any thoughts?
 
  #11  
Old 06-15-12, 08:20 AM
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just inspected the plugs on both machines - they say 125/250v...any thoughts?
That pretty much confirms they are rated for europian equipment and not North American.

This would indicated that either something internal to the devices (unlikely) was modified/installed or there is a converter between those plugs and your electrical pannel.

You are probably looking into some electrician's work.

On a side note, if both units have the same plug (voltage requirements), have you tried plugging in the dryer (believe it was working based on your original post) into the receptical the washer was plugged into? This would confirm if it was the actual washer or the power modifier that should be between the plug and your breaker pannel.
 
  #12  
Old 06-15-12, 09:18 AM
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European laundry equipment is not uncommon in the US. Japan also uses a 50 Hz. power system but there are a lot of Japanese built items in almost every category used in the US.

I have an Asko laundry set and the nameplate lists it using 230 volts, 60 Hz. and a single 30 ampere circuit. With mine the dryer plugs into the wall receptacle (standard 30 ampere dryer receptacle) and the washer plugs into the dryer. As I recall, both the Miele (spelling?) and the Bosch require separate 240 volt receptacles or a combination "splitter" cordset to connect to the US standard dryer receptacle. With all three manufacturer's the washing machine IS a 240 volt (nominal) appliance.

Rohang, you need to determine if the two receptacles you have are on two different circuits or merely two receptacles on the same circuit. You need to determine the wire size used and how the equipment grounding is connected. You MAY need to run new wiring for one, or perhaps both, receptacles. US electrical code calls for a 20 ampere 120 volt circuit for the washing machine and a 30 ampere 240/120 volt circuit for the electric dryer.
 
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