Operating a 110V appliance off of 120V circuit?

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  #1  
Old 06-25-12, 02:07 AM
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Operating a 110V appliance off of 120V circuit?

Hi Folks,

I have an appliance that I've purchased overseas. It's rated at 110V/60Hz/500W and I wish to install it at my home in the U.S. Typically the voltage at the outlets at my place fluctuate from about 119V to 122V during the day.

The electrical guy where I purchased the appliance recommended that I find a way to drop the voltage down to around 110V rather than hooking it up directly to the 120V circuit. He said there is a potential for it to have a shorter lifespan if I operate at 120V all the time.

So, a couple of questions come to mind:
  1. Would there really be much harm in using it on a 120V circuit?
  2. Would there be a simple method of dropping the voltage down from 120V to 110V at one specific outlet?
Thanks,

Greg
 
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  #2  
Old 06-25-12, 02:45 AM
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Welcome to the forums! Nominal voltages for US appliances is 120 volts. Many older appliances are rated at 110v as that was the norm years ago. With the same frequency and acceptable wattage, the 120 volts should not be a problem in running it. Of course it would help to know what the appliance is, and what country it was purchased from.
 
  #3  
Old 06-25-12, 04:42 AM
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Hello Larry,

Thanks for the welcome and reply.

The appliance I'm speaking of is an electric dish dryer purchased in Taiwan. Very similar to the model shown on this site.

However, the specific model which I purchased is not shown on their website for some reason.

Regards, Greg
 
  #4  
Old 06-25-12, 06:49 AM
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I'd return it if it is not certified by UL or similar agency for use in the US though I guess that is not an option in this case. Running a buck boost transformer for a small appliances hardly makes sense to me but is an option. Depending on cost of the dish dryer you might try plug-and-pray but I won't advise that.

Personal remarks. Dish dryers are not normally a standalone appliance in the US. They are part of a dishwasher. Why do you feel you need this? Actually I have never heard of a dish dryer.
 
  #5  
Old 06-25-12, 07:37 AM
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Hi Ray,

These types of dish dryers are quite common throughout Asia and Europe. For the most part it's because extra or spacious living area is a luxury.

That's the basis for getting one myself. I've found that they really come in quite handy and I don't have a very large space available to me. Countertop area is at a premium and no room or need for a regular dishwasher. These dryers are normally installed above a sink. I just want a situation in that the space available to me is more efficiently utilized.

I'm attaching photos of typical kitchens from a showroom in Taiwan. About as big as a bedroom closest in the U.S.

Regards,

Greg
 
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Last edited by Greg33; 06-25-12 at 08:05 AM.
  #6  
Old 06-25-12, 07:48 AM
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Well your in luck if this was intended for use in Tiwan. Tiwan voltage is 110-120v same as the Us so your good to go. Electrical Plug/Outlet and Voltage Information for Taiwan (Republic of China/Chinese Taipei) : Adaptelec.com, International Electrical Specialists
 
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