Current bathroom outlet is not GFCI, what to do?

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-25-12, 09:35 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 9
Current bathroom outlet is not GFCI, what to do?

House was built in late 50's. I'm doing some improvements in the bathroom and want to replace the electrical outlet that is near the sink. But it is not a GFCI outlet. Do I replace with a GFCI outlet, or do I replace with standard outlet? Looks like this outlet is chained with other outlets in the next room. Thanks for the feedback.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-25-12, 09:54 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 18,759
Replace it with a GFCI. What's the next room?
 
  #3  
Old 06-25-12, 10:05 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 9
The next room is a bedroom. I'm guessing the bathroom outlet is in the middle of the circuit (not sure if that's the right terminology). I just removed the current outlet, and half of the outlets in the next room stopped working. It's like the ones on the left side are good, but the ones of the right side (bathroom in between) are dead. So, if the GFCI is tripped, the outlets on the right side of the room stop as well, correct? So, I shouldn't hook up and critical items to these outlets?

Thanks, again.
 
  #4  
Old 06-25-12, 10:07 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,594
The electrical code would require any location that would require GFI protection as a new install to have the GFI protection installed if the device is replaced. Install the GFI using the LINE side terminals only, if the downstream receptacles do not also require GFI protection.
 
  #5  
Old 06-25-12, 12:16 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
I just removed the current outlet, and half of the outlets in the next room stopped working.
Quick questions:
How many cables enter the box where the receptacle is mounted?
How many wires are in each cable and what color is each wire?
Were the receptacles on the right side of the bedroom the only devices that lost power when the bathroom receptacle was removed?
 
  #6  
Old 06-25-12, 12:26 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,594
The receptacle that stopped working were depending on the removed receptacle to make a connection. This is typical.
 
  #7  
Old 06-25-12, 12:39 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 9
Looks like 2 sets of wires. White, black, and bare copper (ground?) for both. From what I can tell, only the outlets on the right side of the bathroom lost power.

thanks
 
  #8  
Old 06-25-12, 01:06 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
Looks like 2 sets of wires. White, black, and bare copper (ground?) for both. From what I can tell, only the outlets on the right side of the bathroom lost power.
OK. As PCBoss said,
Install the GFI using the LINE side terminals only, if the downstream receptacles do not also require GFI protection.
Your new 15A GFCI receptacle will have two pairs of silver and brass terminals. One pair will be marked LOAD and should be covered by a piece of tape when you pull the receptacle out of the box. Leave that tape in place; you will not be connecting any wires to that pair of terminals.

The other pair of terminals will be marked LINE. Each of those terminals will have two slots behind it. There will also be a STRIP GAUGE marked on the back of the terminal. Trim or re-strip the two black wires and the two white wires so that the the length of each exposed conductor matches the length shown in that diagram.

Add a 6"-8" piece of bare copper wire to the two bare copper wires entering the box. Splice (twist with pliers and protect with a wire nut) those three bare wires together. Attach the other end of the added piece to the box if it's metal. or terminate it to the ground terminal on the GFCI receptacle if the box is non-metallic.

Insert the stripped ends of the two white wires into the slots behind the silver LINE terminal screw and clamp them by tightening the screw. Insert the stripped ends of the two black wires into the slots behind the brass LINE terminal screw and clamp them by tightening that screw. Fold the wires into the box and mount and cover the new receptacle.

Wired this way, the GFCI technology will kill the power to the GFCI receptacle when a fault is detected, but the power to the bedroom receptacles will not be affected.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 06-25-12 at 07:23 PM. Reason: clarification of receptacle rating after PM.
  #9  
Old 06-25-12, 06:05 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 9
Awesome! Thanks, all, for the feedback. Nashkat1's step-by-step really took some guess work out of it. Unboxed the outlet and had a good idea what i was looking at. doityourself.com comes thru again!
 
  #10  
Old 06-25-12, 07:24 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,594
Thanks. Glad we could be of help and that the instructions were so clear.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes