electric range installation 240v

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  #1  
Old 01-21-01, 03:39 PM
Guest
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Question

i have an old farm house with a gas range. i bought an electric range 240v. need to know what amp breakers to use and what gauge wiring to install. range has oven and burners in one unit. total wattage used by all burners and oven is 9700 watts. panel is less than 15 feet away from range location and is 110v access. need to know what materials to use and any instructions or advice you have for me would be very appreciated. materials i do have are range, 240v outlet, junction box, and cover plate. if more info is needed, please post here or email at [email protected]

thanks alot
 
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  #2  
Old 01-22-01, 09:34 AM
J
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Location: Fayetteville, NY, USA
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You will need a 2-pole, 50 amp breaker and #6 copper wire. It is typically sold in a 3-conductor cable, 2 are insulated and one (the neutral) is bare. When you mentioned a "junction box" did you mean that literally, or did you mean a range receptacle. Typically you would install a range cord with plug on the range, and a receptacle on the wall behind it. This makes removal for cleaning or maintenance easier.

As far as your panel you indicated "110 volt access", but the range is 240v, and I suspect that your panel is too. Instaling a 2-pole breaker gets you 240v by taking one 120v feed from each "hot" leg in the panel. (240v single phase is nothing more than two 120v feeds.)

Hope that helps.

Juice
 
  #3  
Old 01-22-01, 11:32 AM
Wgoodrich
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By the 99 NEC you are allowed to use a cable with two insulated wires and one bare wire only if that cable is TYPE SE rated and only if that cable already exist in the dwelling.

If you run a new cable as a new installation whether in an existing or new home, you must use a cable that has 3 insulated wires with one of those wires white or gray and a bare wire or green wire. A four conductor cable is required for all new 240 volt branch circuit installations if 120 volts are utilized in the appliance like light bulbs etc. This is especially true with ranges and dryers that are 220 volt rated. You must also use a four prong range plug for ranges and a four prong dryer plug for a dryer.The pigtails coming from the range or dryer must also be a four wire pigtail.

A 6 ga wire is fine whether copper or aluminum, and the 50 amp breaker is fine, just remember that all new circuits ran to an electric range or dryer must be four wire all the way with an insulated nuetral conductor.

Good Luck

Wg
 
  #4  
Old 01-22-01, 12:10 PM
J
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Gee, I was no aware of the four-wire requirement for ranges. Being a true 240 volt device I have been told in the past that only 3 wires are required. Not carrying a ground always bugged me, though. Most of the installations I have seen, mainly '70s & early '80s era, are 3-wire and 3-prong receptacles and whips. I haven't had to work on one in awhile, though. (In one of my many previous lives I did a brief stint as a major appliance repairman.) When did this change?

Juice
 
  #5  
Old 01-22-01, 12:23 PM
Wgoodrich
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They approached the subject in the 96 version of the NEC and made it quite exact in the 99 version of the NEC.

The range is not a pure 220 volt appliance nor is the dryer.

The range has clocks, light bulbs, and some times fan motors, etc. that run on 120 volt. Thus creating a current on the neutral causing an unbalanced load between the two hot conductors.

The same happens in a dryer. The heat element is a true 220 volt device, but the motor of a dryer is usually 120 volt powered, again causing a current carrying neutral due to the unbalanced load beteen the two hot conductors.

Good Luck

Wg
 
  #6  
Old 01-22-01, 12:32 PM
Gary Tait
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In all my life, ranges and dryers were/are 120/240V,
requiring a neutral. They used to get their neutral
from the ground, but they want ground and neutral separate
now, since at least 1996.

You MAY be able to run the range off of 110, if you can find
which hot leg supplies the timer/lamp/outlets, and
connect the other hot to neutral. You won't get as hot a stove though.
 
  #7  
Old 01-22-01, 12:39 PM
J
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Location: Fayetteville, NY, USA
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I new a dryer was basically two 120 volt circuits. I thought of a range as purely resistive 240v circuits like an electric water heater. But I didn't really stop to think about the lights, bells & whistles on a range, though, which of course are not pure 240v resistive now, are they! Once again I leave here smarter than when I came. Thanks, Wg.

Juice
 
  #8  
Old 01-25-01, 06:12 AM
Guest
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So this would apply for any 220v item? Say a new air conditioner compressor unit? I am wondering because when I wired my range and dryer I used the 4-wire--just because H-depot did not sell 8-2 by the foot--so I got 8-3--then had to by new pig tails and recepticles.(actually #8 for the range and #10 for dryer) But when my new ac unit arrived with my new furnance(ac not installed yet--too cold out) The HVAC guy left 10-2 stubbed out in the breaker box and a 30amp double pole breaker for future hook-up. I asked him if we should use 10-3--he said it is not needed--only need the extra wire for ranges because of the 110v lights, fans, etc. I have some 10-3 left over and would be easy to replace now before hook-up!
 
  #9  
Old 01-25-01, 06:37 AM
Gary Tait
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Just those that requires a neutral. Air conditioners,
water heaters,baseboard,etc, require no neutral, as
they usually need 220V only.
 
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