NJ code for spa and shed.

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  #41  
Old 07-18-12, 01:27 PM
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But I see this and figure I can screw it to the side of a 2x4 in the shed.

Does this look OK?
Not to me, because it's a main lug panel. I'm 99% certain you need a disconnect for all the power as soon as it gets into the shed, and that means using a main breaker panel. Plus I would go for more breaker spaces - this one only has eight.

Any indoor main breaker panel will work inside the shed. Yes, it should have the surface-mount cover this one has. Here's one that's Square D QO: Square D by Schneider Electric 100 Amp 20-Space 20-Circuit Indoor Main Breaker Load Center with Cover. That's if you go to the big box store, buy new, and pay retail. Used or surplus is good, and the supply houses often charge less than the HI centers.
 
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  #42  
Old 07-18-12, 02:00 PM
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Holy Christmas!!!!!! $88 bucks. Your getting like Furd. Wait until I tell the Admiral about this...She will not be happy.

I better start dinner or vacuum the house to start earning brownie points.






 
  #43  
Old 07-19-12, 05:34 PM
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Well I figure today was a cool 84f so why procrastinate any longer. The trench was not going to be dug just sitting there looking at the ground....LOL

The Admiral will not let me put a sub panel in at this time. The grandson is getting baptized Sunday and my oldest sons B-day is same day so a lot of $ is going out this month...Uggg I feel old.

Anyway I would have dipped into my secret stash but it seems that has been dipped into too many times and carry's a balance of $0.


So I will do the sub when I get more funds, and I thank everyone that assisted me. Even though I am sure many of you were mumbling what a PITA I was.

Here are some pics.


Starting the main dig.

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Coming down from the coop I drilled into the 6x6 footing. I hope this is allowed.

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I put a 1/2" LB here on coop. It looks big enough to fit 3 wire-nuts for the romex to THWN tie together. I put a small piece of 1/2" sticking in the coop. I don't need a clamp in there do I? Also I will not glue it in case I need to change to 3/4"

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Conduit in with string inserted. I tell you what a PITA. It was like stringing popcorn at Christmas.... Nothing glued. Just dry fit.

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Taped wire together, and taped to string. getting ready to pull.
Well wife ,( Admiral ), will pull . I will push.

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Success!!!

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And all this because of this......


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I will post inside electrical at a later date. Thanks all.
 
  #44  
Old 07-19-12, 09:09 PM
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I put a 1/2" LB here on coop. It looks big enough to fit 3 wire-nuts for the romex to THWN tie together. I put a small piece of 1/2" sticking in the coop. I don't need a clamp in there do I? Also I will not glue it in case I need to change to 3/4"
It may look big enough to hold three 14AWG splices, but it still may not be big enough. Box-fill allowances are based on having enough space to avoid over-crowding and, most importantly, overheating.

IIRC, a 1/2" PVC LB has 4 in.[SUP]3[/SUP] inside. Look inside, at the back of the interior. It will have this information molded into it. If my memory is correct, each 14AWG current-carrying conductor that terminates or makes a splice in a box requires 1 in.[SUP]3[/SUP] of capacity, and all of the EGCs together need another 1 in.[SUP]3[/SUP]. I make that to be 5 in.[SUP]3[/SUP] needed, if my math is also correct.

One other thing. The important thing about keeping all splices inside boxes is to confine any arc or fire. That means that an open piece of conduit emerging from one is not code compliant. So, when your 3/4" pipe stub gets into the coop, you will need to reduce it into a 1/2" female adapter and install a clamp there for the cable.

Almost forgot to say: Looking Good!
 
  #45  
Old 07-20-12, 07:59 AM
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Source: Electrical Contractor: Box-Fill Calculations, Part XII
314.16(C)(2) Conduit Bodies with Splices, Taps and Devices

A common misconception is that conduit bodies cannot contain splices or taps. Where meeting the specifications in 314.16(C)(2) and 314.16(B), conduit bodies can contain splices, taps or devices.

Only those conduit bodies that are durably and legibly marked by the manufacturer with their volume shall be permitted to contain splices, taps or devices. [314.16(C)(2)] If the cubic inch (or cubic centimeter) volume is not marked on the conduit body, no splices, taps or devices can be installed.

For example, a Type LB conduit body with 1-inch raceway entries has been installed. There are no volume markings in or on the conduit body. Three 12 AWG conductors will enter the conduit body through one raceway and will exit through the other raceway.

For this particular installation, the conductors must be cut and spliced. Because the volume is not marked on this conduit body, the conductors must not be spliced. Although it may be of sufficient size, it is a Code violation to splice conductors in this conduit body (see Figure 1).
 
  #46  
Old 07-20-12, 08:29 AM
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1 in.[SUP]3[/SUP] of capacity, and all of the EGCs together need another 1 in.[SUP]3[/SUP]. I make that to be 5 in.[SUP]3[/SUP] needed, if my math is also correct.
Hmmm... 1in [SUP]3[/SUP] x 3 conductors = 3 in [SUP]3[/SUP] + 1 in [SUP]3[/SUP] for all conductors = 4 in [SUP]3[/SUP] ?

But wait I read the code and it says you do not count the ground conductor....


12 Awg. = 2.25 Cu. In. per conductor I found un the code? =4.5cu in

Edit: I'm sorry I checked the box it says 4.3 cu in not 4x3

So too small by .25 cu in?
 

Last edited by lawrosa; 07-20-12 at 08:44 AM. Reason: Changed Box info from 12 cu in to 4.3 cu in.
  #47  
Old 07-20-12, 10:05 AM
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You know I am looking for the code on where the conduit enters the sructure from an LB fitting.

I cant find anything. I would assume you can use a box, but what I read is a short piece of conduit. But needs to stick 1" into structure.

I also read nothing needed right out of the LB, but just a staple with in 6" of where it enters structure. With both make sure LB hole into structure has silicone.

Then what someone stated here is to install a female adapter and a romex clamp?

What is best practice?
 
  #48  
Old 07-20-12, 11:00 AM
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LB fittings along with LRs, LLs, Cs and Ts are collectively known as conduit bodies. Best practice is to not make splices in conduit bodies although it is done far too often. Also, conduit systems are to be complete from end to end. Best practice would preclude "ending" a conduit system by merely using an open-ended conduit with type MN cable entering the open conduit. You definitely want a clamp to hold the type NM in place.

Myself, I would NEVER use type NM in a building where livestock are being kept.
 
  #49  
Old 07-20-12, 01:15 PM
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You know I am looking for the code on where the conduit enters the sructure from an LB fitting.

I cant find anything. I would assume you can use a box, but what I read is a short piece of conduit. But needs to stick 1" into structure.

I also read nothing needed right out of the LB, but just a staple with in 6" of where it enters structure. With both make sure LB hole into structure has silicone.

Then what someone stated here is to install a female adapter and a romex clamp?

What is best practice?
Best practice is to set a box. Use a male adapter on a short piece of conduit to finish the raceway into it. Use 1/2" pipe and fittings all the way and bring the THWN all the way into the inside box. Essentially, 1/2 of what you did behind the spa box. Make the splice to your cable in the box. No worries.

But, speaking of your cable, and to underscore and answer Joel's concern:
Myself, I would NEVER use type NM in a building where livestock are being kept.
You're not, are you? IIRC, you bought Type UF to run as cable inside the coop.

Frankly, I don't know why an old pipe fitter like you isn't running everything in conduit. I'd have done that from the get-go. Far less chance of damage with that.
 
  #50  
Old 07-20-12, 01:44 PM
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You're not, are you? IIRC, you bought Type UF to run as cable inside the coop.
I dont know what UF cable is. Did I note that I am not an electrician? Yes I bought romex to run in the coop with those regular blue boxes.


OK... Tell me what this cable is and what I need in the coop. ( You guys are killing me)












Joel....$99 Jet Blue. Get out here ASAP and finish this for me. I will have one of these set up in the backyard for you. If you dont finish before it starts raining it turns into a poncho. There is an extra poncho if you want to bring a friend.



http://www.fu-kit.com

 
  #51  
Old 07-20-12, 01:44 PM
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12 Awg. = 2.25 Cu. In. per conductor I found un the code? =4.5cu in
Right. I'd forgotten that you're running 12AWG. So,

Originally Posted by Nashkat1
1 in.[SUP]3[/SUP] of capacity, and all of the EGCs together need another 1 in.[SUP]3[/SUP]. I make that to be 5 in.[SUP]3[/SUP] needed, if my math is also correct.
Hmmm... 1in 3 x 3 conductors = 3 in 3 + 1 in 3 for all conductors = 4 in 3?
Mike, you have to read the entire quote in context. What I said was
Originally Posted by Nashkat1
each 14AWG current-carrying conductor that terminates or makes a splice in a box requires 1 in.[SUP]3[/SUP] of capacity, and all of the EGCs together need another 1 in.[SUP]3[/SUP]
You have four current-carrying conductors that you want to splice somewhere. 1 hot and 1 neutral in, and 1 hot and 1 neutral out.

Using the correct value (thanks!) that's 1.25 in.[SUP]3[/SUP] x 4 conductors = 5 in.[SUP]3[/SUP].

I read the code and it says you do not count the ground conductor....
Can you quote that reference? Because everything I've seen says that
All equipment-grounding conductors in a box count as a single conductor volume, based on the largest equipment-grounding conductor that enters the box
Since your ground conductors are also 12AWG, that's another 1.25 in.[SUP]3[/SUP].

Total, you need 6.25 in.[SUP]3[/SUP] of volume. The LB is too small by 2 in.[SUP]3[/SUP]. Splicing in a box, inside, out of the weather, will take care of everything.
 
  #52  
Old 07-20-12, 02:31 PM
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I dont know what UF cable is. Did I note that I am not an electrician? Yes I bought romex to run in the coop with those regular blue boxes.

OK... Tell me what this cable is and what I need in the coop. ( You guys are killing me)
LOL!

OK -

Type UF (really UF-B) is Underground Feeder cable. It's the stuff with the molded-on gray rubbery sheath that I thought I saw in your picture of what you'd bought. Type UF-B Direct Burial

Oops, my bad. That's not Type UF-B in your picture. It's clearly Type NM-B.

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Type NM-B is Non-Metallic sheathed cable. It's the cable that is used indoors, in concealed spaces. A lot of people call it Romex®, but that's a brand name, like Sheetrock® or Frigidaire®. Romex SIMpull® Type NM-B. And it is not what you want anywhere near livestock. Good catch, Joel.

You need to return that Type NM and buy Type UF instead. Or, better yet, just buy some more conduit and single conductor wiring. Sorry we didn't catch this earlier.
 
  #53  
Old 07-20-12, 03:05 PM
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And it is not what you want anywhere near livestock.
Looks the same. Whats the difference? My eye says the NM is loose in a jacket and the UF looks like the jacket is molded around the conductor.

And is that a code to not be able to use this around livestock?


So I either need to run conduit with NM in it, or UF and staple it right to the studs?


 
  #54  
Old 07-20-12, 03:07 PM
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Sorry we didn't catch this earlier.
I did, although it may have been in a PM.

Mike, I know that your rear is grass and "the admiral" is driving the lawnmower but as I have often said to people who wanted to take the cheap route or, "just make it work" you can pay me now or you can pay me later. There is never enough money to do the job right the first time but there always seems to enough money to do the job over at a later date.

Now I'll give you a tip that might save some money today. Pull out that 50 ampere double-pole circuit breaker in the spa panel and plug in a pair of the 20 ampere units in your junk box. Install a GFCI receptacle next to the spa box with a bubble (in-use) cover and connect it to one of the replacement circuit breakers. Connect the wiring from the hen house to the LOAD side of the GFCI receptacle. This way you don't even need to mess with the electrical inside the shed. In fact, if you have (or decide to buy) a 15 or 20 ampere GFCI circuit breaker you won't even need the receptacle, box or bubble cover.
 
  #55  
Old 07-20-12, 03:14 PM
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Type NM cable can ONLY be used in permanently dry locations. I don't know if your hen house would be considered permanently dry. Conduit, when installed outside or buried is never considered to be permanently dry.

Type NM cable has paper filler around the conductors under the outer jacket. Paper will "draw" moisture. Type UF cable has no paper but has the individual conductors embedded in the vinyl of the enclosing jacket. Type UF is a real bear to strip and I avoid it like the plague. You will have a VERY difficult time (next to impossible) working 12-2 UF through 1/2 inch PVC conduit.

Chickens like to peck almost anything they see. They will destroy the outer jacket on NM cable. UF, being stiffer and thicker plastic would last a bit longer but would also eventually fail unless you install it in a manner that the chickens can't get to it.

I haven't read Wiring Simplified for at least forty years but back then they included a chapter on farm wiring. Looking up in the code to see if type NM (or UF) can be used around livestock would take at least an hour for me but had you bought the book it would take you maybe five minutes, assuming the chapter is still included.
 
  #56  
Old 07-20-12, 03:34 PM
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There is never enough money to do the job right the first time but there always seems to enough money to do the job over at a later date.
Well I save all receipts. I got most of my money back for what I cant use, or was beginner buyer screw up. The return lady knows me by very well. I almost feel like we are dating..

Pull out that 50 ampere double-pole circuit breaker in the spa panel and plug in a pair of the 20 ampere units in your junk box. Install a GFCI receptacle next to the spa box with a bubble (in-use) cover and connect it to one of the replacement circuit breakers. Connect the wiring from the hen house to the LOAD side of the GFCI receptacle. This way you don't even need to mess with the electrical inside the shed. In fact, if you have (or decide to buy) a 15 or 20 ampere GFCI circuit breaker you won't even need the receptacle, box or bubble cover.


You know, I think I may fly out by you Furd...we need to talk!!!!!...LOL

Holy unbelievable!!!!! Not yet another wrench Furd!!!! OK listen up. That sounds great. That is good because I wanted to add a outlet outside. Did you just think this up?

Is it even allowed?

1. I have a 50 amp GFI in the main panel. Do I keep that in there?
2. Change the 50 amp in the spa panel to two 20 amp?
3. Tie in the coop to one breaker. The other one is not used. Unless, I should probably do away with that 120 line and feed the shed with the other breaker?
4. Hot to breaker, Neutral to the neutral bar, ground to ground bar?


I have the plastic case model here with the breaker.


http://static.schneider-electric.us/...50BR9801R3.pdf
 
  #57  
Old 07-20-12, 04:04 PM
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Looking at that pdf. you MIGHT have a molded case switch, not a circuit breaker in that spa panel. Before getting too excited try pulling the device out of the panel and then see if you can fit the 20 ampere circuit breakers. If you CAN, then you are good to go.

I had forgotten that you already have a GFCI circuit breaker in the house panel. This means that everything downstream of that circuit breaker has ground fault protection so you don't even need the GFCI receptacle on the outside of the shed but could use a regular receptacle with a bubble cover.

1. I have a 50 amp GFI in the main panel. Do I keep that in there?
Yes.

2. Change the 50 amp in the spa panel to two 20 amp?
Yes, if possible.
3. Tie in the coop to one breaker. The other one is not used. Unless, I should probably do away with that 120 line and feed the shed with the other breaker?
Yes to both questions and then exchange the GFCI inside the shed to a regular receptacle as the GF protection would then be from the circuit breaker in the house panel.

4. Hot to breaker, Neutral to the neutral bar, ground to ground bar?
You got it!
 
  #58  
Old 07-20-12, 04:07 PM
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Is this all code like with the two 20 amp breakers and that disconnect?



So I either need to run conduit with NM in it, or UF and staple it right to the studs?



And in the coop?
 
  #59  
Old 07-20-12, 04:42 PM
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Is this all code like with the two 20 amp breakers and that disconnect?
Absolutely! You may have up to six "handles" on a sub-panel to disconnect all the power without needing a main disconnect.

As for the rest, I don't understand the context. You never want to run "cable" (a factory-made assembly of two or more conductors inside an outer sheath of some sort) through conduit except for short lengths of conduit used for physical protection. If you run type UF inside the hen house then you need to run it in a manner that the chickens cannot get to it or else they will peck it and damage it. Do not use type NM in the hen house under any circumstances.

Turn off the power on the 50 ampere GFCI double pole circuit breaker in the house (I think you mentioned it is off anyway) and see if you can pull off that "circuit breaker" in the spa panel. It might be a factory assembly that doesn't come off. If it DOES come off then see if the 20 ampere single pole circuit breakers fit in its place.
 
  #60  
Old 07-20-12, 04:52 PM
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I went out in the pouring rain to try it.

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OK nash said I can run UF in the coop? If not then I need single strand conductor TWHN and run in conduit?
 
  #61  
Old 07-20-12, 05:17 PM
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Okay, you're set! The spa panel has just become a two-circuit sub-panel. Re-connect the shed interior to the second (to be installed) 20 ampere circuit breaker and cut the existing 120 volt wires off at the conduit on each end (house and spa panel).

Yes, you CAN use the UF in the coop, just place it in a manner that the chickens can't peck it. Use wood, metal, screen or whatever to guard it from the pecking.

Did I save you any money today?
 
  #62  
Old 07-20-12, 05:33 PM
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Last question Furd

cut the existing 120 volt wires off at the conduit on each end (house and spa panel).


No reason to retain this? Could I run that to a outlet installed next to the spa panel so the outlet will be on its own breaker? ( Just asking before I cut it. I was thinking a RV outlet)


Yes, you CAN use the UF in the coop, just place it in a manner that the chickens can't peck it. Use wood, metal, screen or whatever to guard it from the pecking.


Its all going to be up high so no pecking. They will not be able to reach unless they fly like a humming bird.

Just wondering why this UF is OK but NM is not?
And what type boxes inside?
And the LB/individual conductor to UF? Use a LB box for inside?

Did I save you any money today?
Well Furd yes you did. Look in your PM box shortly.



 
  #63  
Old 07-20-12, 05:50 PM
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Cut the existing 120 volt wires off at the conduit on each end (house and spa panel).
No reason to retain this? Could I run that to a outlet installed next to the spa panel so the outlet will be on its own breaker? ( Just asking before I cut it. I was thinking a RV outlet)
Honestly, I don't know the answer. My interpretation of code is that only ONE circuit may be run between buildings but one of the working electricians should know the answer. Ask PCboss, Tolyn, Nash or CasualJoe.

Type NM cable, because it has the paper filler is not acceptable for any kind of outdoors wiring. Type UF IS made specifically for damp and wet locations.


And what type boxes inside?
And the LB/individual conductor to UF? Use a LB box for inside?
Like the question concerning the second (120 volt) circuit to the shed I don't have a good answer. Maybe one of the other guys has.
 
  #64  
Old 07-20-12, 08:18 PM
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Just wondering why this UF is OK but NM is not?
It's not so much that UF is really OK, it's just better that NM. NM becomes waterlogged and is fragile. What's really OK in this situation is individual conductors in conduit.

And what type boxes inside?
Surface-rated boxes, either PVC or metal. Those blue boxes are only compliant for use inside closed walls. (Another thing I wish we'd said something about much earlier.)

And the LB/individual conductor to UF? Use a LB box for inside?
What did you do, get married to cable? If you absolutely, positively have to change over to cable, then make the splices for that in a standard, surface-rated box. LBs are not for splicing; they're for pulling.

Mike, this is a pipe job. No cable is needed to do it right. I could run it in less than a day. I can only imagine how much faster an experienced plumber could do it.
 
  #65  
Old 07-20-12, 09:53 PM
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Honestly, I don't know the answer. My interpretation of code is that only ONE circuit may be run between buildings but one of the working electricians should know the answer. Ask PCboss, Tolyn, Nash or CasualJoe.
Anyone know the answer to this? Now that I am bringing the spa panel 220v on line what is the ruling on the 110V line? ( Was it even ever legal or to code?)

Nash are you ignoring the hatd questions?.....LOL.

I think you did say if there was no spa then its ok for the 110v line. ( Thing is I had the spa and the shed power. Possibly it has to do with inside/outside?
 
  #66  
Old 07-20-12, 11:52 PM
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Here's my interpretation. If both the 20 ampere (120 volt) circuit and the 50 ampere (240/120 volt circuit entered the shed then it would be a code violation. NO ifs, ands or buts about it. However, since only ONE circuit actually enters the building and the other circuit merely has its wiring attached to the OUTSIDE of the building I honestly don't know if it is a violation. If you ran a conduit on the outside of the building to a yard lamp and used that 20 ampere circuit exclusively for the yard lamp, turning it on and off from the house, either with a switch or a time clock or photocell then I'm somewhat sure (definitely not 100% sure) that it would be acceptable under the NEC. That still doesn't mean that a LOCAL code provision might not absolutely prohibit the second circuit no matter where it terminates.
 
  #67  
Old 07-21-12, 05:16 AM
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one of the working electricians should know the answer. Ask PCboss, Tolyn, Nash or CasualJoe.
I am not a chicken coop kinda guy, but I do like eggs and fried chicken. I also try not to work unless I have to. (but I will help friends and family)
 
  #68  
Old 07-21-12, 01:44 PM
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Anyone know the answer to this? Now that I am bringing the spa panel 220v on line what is the ruling on the 110V line? ( Was it even ever legal or to code?)

Nash are you ignoring the hatd questions?.....LOL.
Uh, not on purpose. I thought I'd answered this! Wow, I must have been tireder than I thought last night.

I'm with Joel on this. We run multiple conductors in one raceway (conduit) all the time. The only requirement in play here is the one about feeding the structure, I think! So just keep the old 120V circuit outside.

If the inspector gets wonky about it, screw it. Just feed the outside receptacle off the wiring in the shed, the coop or the spa box itself.

You're going to have a pair of good, solid 20A circuits there anyway - not sure why you need the third one right now. Remember, you can upgrade the main panel breaker and install a subpanel in the shed with a whole bunch of breaker spaces anytime. Well, anytime you get the say-so from the Admiral.
 
  #69  
Old 07-21-12, 02:12 PM
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I think the single circuit to a building is for the purpose of disconnecting all power in case of an emergency. If this IS the reason then the 20 ampere, 120 volt circuit is, and always has been in violation since it does not have a local means of disconnect.

Disconnect the inside shed wiring from the 120 volt circuit and connect it to the second circuit breaker in the spa panel. Put wire nuts on the 120 volt circuit and turn off the circuit breaker in the house panel.
 
  #70  
Old 07-21-12, 02:56 PM
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Use a LB box for inside?
Second answer: If you want to run more pipe, mounting an LB is perfect. If, for some reason, you're thinking of splicing to UF here, then no. See post #64. As Furd said earlier,
You will have a VERY difficult time (next to impossible) working 12-2 UF through 1/2 inch PVC conduit.
 
  #71  
Old 07-21-12, 04:15 PM
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I don't want to run conduit....UF is easier. What boxes, metal plastic?????
 
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Old 07-21-12, 06:27 PM
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Use as little steel as possible as it WILL rust in that environment. I would suggest enclosed surface mount boxes with 3/4 inch hubs. I think they make 1/2 inch female pipe to 3/4 inch slip PVC bushings that you can glue into the hubs (I may be totally wrong about this) and them you could get PVC cord grips (CGB fittings is what the steel ones are called) to hold the UF cable but really, I agree with Nash that doing it all in PVC conduit is the best and actually easier than fiddle-farting around with the UF cable. I HATE working with UF!
 
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Old 07-21-12, 06:35 PM
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I think they make 1/2 inch female pipe to 3/4 inch slip PVC bushings that you can glue into the hubs (I may be totally wrong about this)
That's what I would do too, but we generally just call them PVC 3/4 to 1/2 reducing bushings to reduce a PVC 3/4" male threaded adapter or a 3/4" PVC hub down to 1/2" PVC conduit. Same thing, just different description.
 
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Old 07-21-12, 06:49 PM
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I don't want to run conduit....UF is easier.
The only method of running power that I can think of that is nastier and harder than working with UF is cutting and threading Rob Roy. Or maybe IMC.

Mike, this is a PVC pipe job. And you already own the wire you need - just pull out the wires for the old 120V supply to the spa box. (There, did I save you any money today?)

Go with plastic boxes. They'll look better and, as Furd says, hold up better long-term. And I'd go with 3/4" pipe. I just don't enjoy trying to pull wire through a soda straw.

Here's an earlier thread, where another member did something like what you're doing; more outlets, more boxes, but a similar project. Maybe you'll see some ideas in it: I screwed up. I need a little help. Gotta love the title!!
 
  #75  
Old 07-21-12, 07:06 PM
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we generally just call them PVC 3/4 to 1/2 reducing bushings to reduce a PVC 3/4" male threaded adapter or a 3/4" PVC hub down to 1/2" PVC conduit. Same thing, just different description.
Sounds like a different critter to me. I think Furd was talking about a piece that only has threads on the inside:
1/2 inch female pipe to 3/4 inch slip PVC bushings that you can glue into the hubs...
That said, I just go with the threadless reducers that glue into the larger fitting and accept the smaller pipe, with another swipe of glue. Much less strain on the brain cells.
 
  #76  
Old 07-21-12, 07:08 PM
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...just pull out the wires for the old 120V supply to the spa box.
He can't. The "electrician" that did the original installation taped all the wires together periodically along the length BEFORE pulling them into the conduit.


Oh, I'd MUCH RATHER use RMC or IMC than fight UF cable. They do make threadless connectors for RMC and IMC and threading isn't that hard anyway.
 
  #77  
Old 07-21-12, 07:36 PM
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I'd MUCH RATHER use RMC or IMC than fight UF cable. They do make threadless connectors for RMC and IMC and threading isn't that hard anyway.
Not RMC. I absolutely love running RMC. No I'm talking about the special version of RMC that's coated with the rubbery compound for corrosion resistance. Had to run it in a water or sewer plant once, can't remember which now. Not a lot - maybe only 2 or 3 miles. That's the good news.

The bad news is a special head for the Chicago bender, special heads and teeth for the threader, special jaws for the vise - you name it, it's special and expensive. Then the stuff is just plain nasty to grab hold of and strap into place. THEN you get to grab a can of the spray-on stuff you buy by the pallet and coat every fitting, every strap, and every nick in the original coating. Without getting any on the walls, ceiling, floors, other equipment, yadda, yadda.

I HATE working with UF. It doesn't show me anything I can't do faster and easier with pipe and wire. But I guess I'd take it over that damn coated rigid.
 
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Old 07-21-12, 07:41 PM
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He can't. The "electrician" that did the original installation taped all the wires together periodically along the length BEFORE pulling them into the conduit.
Very good memory Joel. You are correct sir.


Al these fittings and bushings and crude you are talking about is all greek to me. Boxes, suface mount?

Unless you show me pics I can go to the store and buy a gray, metal or blue box and its all the same to me.

Is there really any difference in running NM vs UF???

Yes it seems with all the confusion I may run conduit because that I know.
Gray box, Gray conduit, = glue together.



 
  #79  
Old 07-21-12, 08:21 PM
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No I'm talking about the special version of RMC that's coated with the rubbery compound for corrosion resistance.
I never had to work with that, sounds horrible.

Mike, I'll get back to you.
 
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Old 07-21-12, 08:34 PM
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Yes it seems with all the confusion I may run conduit because that I know.
Gray box, Gray conduit, = glue together.
You got it!

Unless you show me pics I can go to the store and buy a gray, metal or blue box and its all the same to me.
Did you look at the pics in the thread I linked to earlier? That member did what we're talking about here.

I screwed up. I need a little help.
 
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