Kitchen Wiring Clarifications

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  #1  
Old 07-19-12, 09:14 AM
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Kitchen Wiring Clarifications

Hello,

I am wiring my kitchen now, and have a few questions. Here is my current planned setup:

Circuit 1: Washer/Gas Dryer
Circuit 2: Refrigerator
Circuit 3: Dishwasher/Garbage Disposal
Circuit 4: Microwave and Gas Range
Circuit 5: Counter Top Outlets (3 of them)

I know that code says:
Kitchen counter top receptacles must be supplied by at least two small appliance branch circuits.
and
At least two 20-ampere branch circuits are required to feed receptacle outlets for small appliance loads, including refrigeration equipment in the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, and dining room. These circuits, whether two or more are used, shall NOT supply anything other than receptacles in these areas. Lighting outlets and built-in appliances such as garbage disposals, hood fans, dishwashers, and trash compactors are NOT permitted on these circuits.

So my questions are:
Do I really need to run 2 circuits to supply my 3 counter top outlets?

Do I really need to run a separate circuit to supply counter top lighting, or is there a circuit there that I can supply it off of?

Thank you for your time and help.
-John
 
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  #2  
Old 07-19-12, 09:51 AM
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Do I really need to run 2 circuits to supply my 3 counter top outlets?
Yes. Two dedicated, GFCI-protected, 20 ampere branch circuits to feed receptacle outlets for small appliance loads.

Do I really need to run a separate circuit to supply counter top lighting, or is there a circuit there that I can supply it off of?
Any of the first four circuits. That said, I don't see the kitchen lighting circuit in your list. How about using that one?
 
  #3  
Old 07-19-12, 01:44 PM
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Even if you were only installing two countertop receptacles you would still need two 20 amp circuits.

Are you aware that the code requires different spacing for countertop receptacles? There shall be no point on a countertop more than 2' from a receptacle, and any counter 12" or greater needs a receptacle.
 
  #4  
Old 07-19-12, 02:49 PM
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washer/gas dryer would be laundry circuit so needs to be dedicated 20amp.

to avoid arguments built in microwaves normally need to be on their own circuit.
 

Last edited by Nashkat1; 07-19-12 at 03:31 PM. Reason: to remove non-beneficial or inaccurate advice
  #5  
Old 07-19-12, 07:04 PM
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Just curious what is wrong with putting the refrigerator and the gas range on one of the counter top circuits? Or did I say something else wrong?
 
  #6  
Old 07-19-12, 08:10 PM
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Both can be on a small appliance circuit.
 
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Old 07-19-12, 08:30 PM
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My apology, Astuff. I believed that, because the small appliance circuits are dedicated circuits, nothing else could be connected to them. Apparently, I was wrong.

I regret that, and I will be doing some research to update my understanding. In the meantime, please feel free to connect the refrigerator or the gas range, or both, to either of those circuits.
 
  #8  
Old 07-20-12, 05:07 AM
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From the 2011 NEC Article 210.52

(B) Small Appliances.(1) Receptacle Outlets Served.
In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets covered by 210.52(A), all countertop outlets covered by 210.52(C), and receptacle outlets for refrigeration equipment.
Exception No. 1: In addition to the required receptaclesspecified by 210.52, switched receptacles supplied from a general-purpose branch circuit as defined in 210.70(A)(1),Exception No. 1, shall be permitted.Exception No. 2: The receptacle outlet for refrigeration equipment shall be permitted to be supplied from an individual branch circuit rated 15 amperes or greater.
(2) No Other Outlets.
The two or more small-appliance branch circuits specified in 210.52(B)(1) shall have no other outlets.
Exception No. 1: A receptacle installed solely for the electrical supply to and support of an electric clock in any ofthe rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1).Exception No. 2: Receptacles installed to provide powerfor supplemental equipment and lighting on gas-fired ranges, ovens, or counter-mounted cooking units.
(3) Kitchen Receptacle Requirements.
Receptacles installed in a kitchen to serve countertop surfaces shall be supplied by not fewer than two small-appliance branch circuits,either or both of which shall also be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the same kitchen and in other rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1). Additional small-appliance branch circuits shall be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the kitchen and other rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1). No small appliance
branch circuit shall serve more than one kitchen.
 
  #9  
Old 07-20-12, 06:32 AM
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If possible, I like to make the fridge the first stop on one of the two small-appliance branch circuits. Second stop will be a GFI recep., then the remaining 'downstream' receps on the load side of the GFI.
This comes from old school thinking that the fridge motor load might trip the GFI.
 
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Old 07-20-12, 07:04 AM
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If the refrigerator is tripping a GFI, the appliance needs to be repaired.
 
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Old 07-20-12, 07:47 AM
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Thanks, PC. This is just the clarification I was looking for. Senor Mouse has addressed one of my concerns - I also prefer to not connect a motor to a GFCI-protected circuit. And I see that while the 120V receptacle for the controls on a gas range or cooktop may be put on one of the kitchen small appliance circuits, it does not have to be.

Here's a question, though. What part of a small appliance circuit is required to have GFCI protection? All of the countertop receptacles? Just the kitchen countertop receptacles within 6' of the sink? All of the receptacles in the dining room or breakfast room? Surely not those, but what;s the requirement?

When I renovated our 1908 house, I supplied the dining room with its own 20A receptacle circuit, That met the requirement for a small appliance circuit. But I didn't give that circuit GFCI protection. The dining room was across the hall from the kitchen, and had no plumbing anywhere near it, so GFCI didn't even enter my thinking.
 
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Old 07-20-12, 10:22 AM
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It is my understanding of the 2011 NEC that all receptacles in a residence MUST be AFCI protected except those that are required to have GFCI protection. (Note that this may be altered in LOCAL codes.) That would preclude having the refrigerator on a non-AFCI or non-GFCI protected receptacle.

For the record, while my house, built in 1987, has GFCI circuit breakers for the small appliance branch circuits I have NEVER had one trip other than from overload (once) or under test conditions. Certainly not by my refrigerator. Nor have I ever known anyone that mentioned their refrigerator being the cause of a tripping GFCI receptacle or circuit breaker.

I have all my receptacle circuits in the garage/shop with GFCI protection from the GFCI receptacles first in line with each circuit and none of my power tools have ever tripped the GFCI. When I had my roof replaced the roofers DID have one of their compressors that would trip the GFCI receptacle but I strongly suspect that the cause was the compressor motor and not the receptacle.
 
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Old 07-20-12, 02:52 PM
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Here's a question, though. What part of a small appliance circuit is required to have GFCI protection? All of the countertop receptacles? Just the kitchen countertop receptacles within 6' of the sink? All of the receptacles in the dining room or breakfast room? Surely not those, but what;s the requirement?
I cannot speak to the 2011 NEC, but I don't think there are a lot of changes regarding GFCI and AFCI protection from the 2008 NEC. I like this chart from Mike Holt which clearly spells out the 2008 NEC requirements. For example, in the chart you see that all countertop and island receptacles in a kitchen require GFCI protection. Other receptacles in the kitchen not required to be GFCI protected do not need AFCI protection. The 6 foot rule is only used at laundry, utility and wet bar sinks and not in a kitchen. I can't say this was not changed in the 2011, but I didn't think it was.

http://www.adairinspection.com/xsite...and%20AFCI.pdf
 
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Old 07-20-12, 08:01 PM
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Thanks, CJ, I think that clarifies it: In a dwelling unit kitchen, GFCI protection is required for all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces. But GFCI protection isnít required for receptacles that serve built-in appliances, such as dishwashers or kitchen waste disposals. Nor is it required for receptacles that serve large appliances such as ranges and refrigerators, nor for convenience receptacles. That's what I thought, but it's nice to have it confirmed.

Especially by Mike Holt. I've bookmarked this.
 
  #15  
Old 07-21-12, 04:58 AM
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Nash, keep in mind that illustrated chart from Mike Holt is per the 2008 NEC. There could be some changes in the 2011 NEC, but I have found it very useful.
 
  #16  
Old 07-21-12, 07:35 AM
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2011 afci doesn't look much different. added another exception for conduit in concrete can use receptacle type afcis.

copied for the code (hopefully no typos)

210.12 Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection

(A) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets installed in dwelling unit family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by a listed arc-fault circuit interrupter, combination-type, installed to provide protection of the branch circuit.
 
  #17  
Old 07-21-12, 07:44 AM
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2011 GFCIs in 210.8 (A) - 125-volt receptacles

Bathrooms
Garages, + accessory buildings w/ floor at or below grade-not habitable
outdoors other than snow
crawl spaces at or below grade
unfinished basements
Kitchens - where receptacles are installed to serve counter tops
sinks - other than kitchens - 6'
boathouses

The Ground-fault circuit-interrupter device must be installed at a readily accessible location.
 
  #18  
Old 07-21-12, 08:01 AM
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  #19  
Old 07-21-12, 06:12 PM
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added another exception for conduit in concrete can use receptacle type afcis.
This exception could be very useful IF any manufacturers actually manufactured a AFCI receptacle, but they still don't. The 2011 NEC is the second code to reference and allow them IIRC.
 
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