grounding gas lines

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Old 07-29-12, 07:55 AM
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grounding gas lines

I have a outdoor grill and fire pit fed with natural gas flexible gas line.Customer is worried about lightning striking and gas explosion.What is the proper way to ground?
 
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Old 07-29-12, 08:03 AM
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Gas lines are bonded, not grounded.

Does the grill use electric? Waht type of gas line?
 
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Old 07-29-12, 08:19 AM
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Gas won't explode unless miked with the proper ratio of oxygen. Gas in a pipe line contains no oxygen and can't explode. If the line is breached the escaping gas may mix with air and burn if there is an ignition source but it is not likely to explode out side because it must be trapped somewhere where the correct mix of air and gas can be created to fuel an explosion. Of course a lightning strike can cause an explosion but it is an electrical explosion not dependent on what it hits.
 
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Old 07-29-12, 02:00 PM
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CSST perforation due to lightning is well-documented. My understanding is that CSST manufacturers certify their installers, so certified installers should know the requirements, although they may have to hire an electrician to do it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0SvS40oYMiE
 
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Old 07-30-12, 07:01 PM
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UGH! So I need to bond my gas pipe too? I thought I just got myself sorted out with the intersystem bonding termination. My gas line is on the opposite side of the house from my service panel. So I need to run at least a 6 ga ground from the gas line before it entires my house over to the ground bar in my service panel?
 
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Old 07-30-12, 08:23 PM
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Not a code expert, but I think you could just bond it to the nearest cold water pipe provided you have metal water piping. I am also interested in some other opinions.
 
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Old 07-31-12, 05:54 AM
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The video I linked is I believe specific to CSST. If you have CSST everything I've seen indicates that yes, you should bond your gas piping to ground. I do not believe it is required to do it outside but it must be done by approved means, i.e. not by stripping back the CSST's plastic sheath and wrapping the bonding conductor around it.

If your gas piping is all copper or all black iron, it may be acceptable that it is grounded via the connected equipment.

Find out what code applies locally to CSST and gas piping in general. Your jurisdiction may or may not adhere to the National Fuel Gas Code, NFPA 54.
 
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Old 07-31-12, 10:06 AM
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My gas line is on the opposite side of the house from my service panel. So I need to run at least a 6 ga ground from the gas line before it entires my house over to the ground bar in my service panel?
You can do it inside. Both gas and water, before the first fitting inside, IIRC.
 
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Old 07-31-12, 04:50 PM
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You can bond the gas piping to the electrical ground (grounding electrode system) by running a #6 copper wire from the gas pipe to one of the existing #6 ground wires (grounding electrode conductors). Use clamps intended for this purpose and connect to the gas pipe within 5 feet of the pipe's exiting the house foundation.

If there is a gas appliance that uses electricity and is wired up uwing a code compliant circuit with ground wire (equipment grounding conductor) then it is not necessary to add the #6 copper wire from a gas pipe.

The gas pipe exiting the house does not count as a grounding electrode, so the fat wire that is clamped to the gas pipe is called a bonding jumper rather than a GEC. It would be called a GEC if it continued past the gas pipe to a ground rod or the water pipe.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 07-31-12 at 05:22 PM.
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Old 07-31-12, 05:17 PM
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If there is a gas appliance that uses electricity and is wired up uwing a code compliant circuit with ground wire (equipment grounding conductor) then it is not necessary to add the #6 copper wire from a gas pipe.
Appliance? Such as......a gas furnace?
 
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Old 07-31-12, 05:36 PM
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Yes, gas furnace or stove or water heater or clothes dryer.
 
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Old 07-31-12, 05:44 PM
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Excellent information, Allan. I have several appliances attached to the gas line. At least one of them is properly grounded, so I am covered.
 
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Old 08-01-12, 03:36 PM
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If there is a gas appliance that uses electricity and is wired up uwing a code compliant circuit with ground wire (equipment grounding conductor) then it is not necessary to add the #6 copper wire from a gas pipe.
Are you referring to piping installations that include CSST? Or in jurisdictions that have amended the requirements? If so please clarify with a source citation if possible.

The NFPA 54 and NFPA 70 info that I have seen, indicates that the 6 AWG bonding conductor is required for CSST. Here are a couple of examples.

http://www.we-energies.com/outages_s..._policyreq.pdf

New Requirements for CSST Installation - Fire Engineering
 
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