Outlet Cover Doesn't Fit in Ledgestone Backsplash

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  #1  
Old 08-08-12, 06:45 PM
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Outlet Cover Doesn't Fit in Ledgestone Backsplash

Hi. This was our first time doing a backsplash. Our electrician was supposed to come over before we did our backsplash but had to cancel. He told us to go ahead and complete our backsplash. But he did not realize (and we didn't know that it would be a problem) that we were using ledgestone with the intent that the electrical sockets were to be sunk in and the cover plates would be flush against the wall (tucked in to the backsplash) not on the outside of the ledgestone. The ledgestone is uneven and we tried putting the cover plates on the outside of it but they don't sit flat and look pretty bad. Since we had no idea that it would be this big of a problem, we went ahead and completed the backsplash. Now there is not enough space for the cover plates to fit inside. Thinking we could just cut the cover plates we sawed them down in size but the edges are really rough and it looks very 'homemade.' Any advice would be wonderful!
 
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Old 08-08-12, 07:17 PM
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Can you post pictures so we can better understand the problem? http://www.doityourself.com/forum/li...-pictures.html
 
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Old 08-08-12, 07:54 PM
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I had a spot in my house where the plate was too big to fit the cutout in the molding. I just cut it with my utility knife and siliconed the joint. You barely notice it.
 
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Old 08-09-12, 03:10 AM
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This isn't yours is it Justin???? Just wondering.

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  #5  
Old 08-09-12, 06:07 AM
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I'd consider cutting the ledgestone. With a good angle grinder with a diamond blade it should cut nice and cleanly. You may be able to do the same thing with a Dremel, depending on the size of the stone.

Alternatively, you could maybe use a "handy box" cover. It's a metal cover that is smaller than a typical coverplate. You do need to make sure though that it covers the entire box. You'd also need to paint it, since the bare aluminum look is probably not what you're going for.
 
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Old 08-09-12, 05:14 PM
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Thinking we could just cut the cover plates we sawed them down in size but the edges are really rough and it looks very 'homemade.'
Not having seen the pictures yet I don't know if this would work or not, but nylon plates are flexible and can be cut with a sharp utility knife. I doubt you'll find nylon plates at the big box, but supply houses carry them. The are used more for commercial work than residential.
 
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Old 08-09-12, 06:16 PM
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Nah, mine is a 2gang nylon housing a switch and a decora duplex.
 
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Old 08-09-12, 06:49 PM
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Thanks and Pics

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Thanks for the great info! I am going to check out those ideas. Here are some photos of what we have done. Any more thoughts? Thanks!
 
  #9  
Old 08-09-12, 06:52 PM
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You need to cut out the stone more, I doubt you have enough space to remove and replace those devices.
 
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Old 08-09-12, 11:31 PM
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Reread the OP.. The electrician was there after the backsplash was completed, so there's room. He got them in there, they can get them out.

I'll be blunt and honest, that looks horrible. You need to scrape all that silicone off, get rid of those covers and try again, but take ACCURATE measurements of the holes and use a very sharp blade or a scroll saw with an ultra fine blade. You cant use a miter saw, table saw, or whatever you used on those plates (Joe, those are the nylon ones - which both Blue and Orange carry BTW -, you can tell by the shredded edges). You also need to use a straightede to guide your cuts because the sloppy crooked cuts look worse than the shredded edges.

And as for the silicone, you don't need to use the entire tube and smear it all over - because contrary to what it says on the label, it WILL turn yellow, and then you'll be able to see what a mess you made with it. Just a thin bead all the way around the joint between the cover and the stone, then smooth it out with a wet finger.
 
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Old 08-10-12, 05:04 AM
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My cutting method I have use in the past is to screw the cover plate to a well secured board. Then using a hack saw with a 32 tooth blade cut them. I place the saw touching the whole surface as I cut not angled touching only a small ares as I cut. That keeps the cut line straighter. You may want to make a jig similar to a miter box for this. Touch up with very fine sand paper when finished.

Personal opinion. I would never try to place receptacles in that surface except as last resort. How high does the back splash go? Is there no way to place them above? Before I did that (recessed them) I would mount the fixtures flush and the seal The gaps under the plate with latex not silicon caulk. Latex caulk can be "finessed" with a damp sponge after drying a few minutes to look very nice. Local code permitting if nothing else I'd put the fixtures in the cabinet face (horizontal not the usual vertical) if there was room.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 08-10-12 at 05:28 AM.
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Old 08-10-12, 12:33 PM
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I may be too gutsy, but working with it all day long, you get a little more comfortable. I set my table saw to the width I need, then lower the blade to where it may just touch the cover, raising it as I see fit, and if necessary. Once I have it scored, it usually breaks right off and I sand down the edges. Not for the faint of heart or if you aren't comfortable with big machinery.
 
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Old 08-10-12, 01:21 PM
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I look at that stone work and all I can see is a horrible thing to clean.
 
  #14  
Old 08-10-12, 02:27 PM
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Furd wrote:
I look at that stone work and all I can see is a horrible thing to clean.
No fair reading my mind.
 
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Old 08-10-12, 02:47 PM
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At least Furd had the "what for" to say it. I was biting my tongue, wanting to. Grease build up will be a nightmare. And why weren't the cover plates sanded on the edges. Looks hairy.
 
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Old 08-10-12, 04:53 PM
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Any more thoughts?
Yep, but you don't want to hear them, I think you've heard enough already. Good luck!
 
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