Cat 5 wall plate that doesn't accept plugs

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  #1  
Old 08-16-12, 11:56 PM
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Cat 5 wall plate that doesn't accept plugs

I currently run a flat telephone wire from a jack in the living room, through the wall, into a bedroom. It runs along a 220 volt air conditioner power cord for a couple of feet with no apparent problem, but now I want to connect it to a wall mount jack in the bedroom instead of directly to the phone, and I figured it's a good time to switch to cat5, or whatever's best for connecting to a phone receptacle these days.

The cat5 will be stapled to the wall with those nail-in staple things and I think the connection to the wall should be permanent too. If I did use a jack, I'd want it to accept a phone plug, not a cat5 plug, but it looks like there's no such thing as a phone plug for a cat5 cable.

In the 1960s, this apartment had a cat3 cable (or some such round phone cable) coming out from the bottom of a close wall plate, and there wasn't even a hole in the plate. The cable was allowed to be slightly crushed by the edge of the plate. I assume there's a better way. Do I have to drill a cat5 sized hole in a blank plate, or do they make something like that?
 
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  #2  
Old 08-17-12, 01:01 AM
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What exactly are you trying to accomplish? Are you trying to run a new telephone jack (for voice telephone service) in the bedroom or are you attempting to run an Ethernet (data) connection from a central router to the bedroom?

Category 5e cable should NOT be stapled as it can alter the data characteristics of the cable. Instead of staples use straps that will hold the cable in place but not crush it.

Keystone wall plates are readily available in one through six hole versions. Keystone jacks, available in standard two, four and six position telephone versions and eight position data versions as well as many other configurations are also readily available. Any Internet electronics supply will have them and both of the major big box mega-mart homecenters have them as well. The jacks simply snap into the wall plates. Surface mount jacks are available as well although not quite as common.
 
  #3  
Old 08-17-12, 05:09 AM
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From the OP, it sounds like they are looking to upgrade CAT3 cable to CAT5 cable for POT (plain old telephone) service.
Upgrading from CAT3 (standard phone cable) to CAT5 is really not nessessary unless you need to make the repair, and happen to have CAT5 cable kicking around. You will see no improvement in service with this upgrade.
CAT 5 also has 8 wires (4 twisted pairs) which unless grounded at both ends, could cause you some issues if you are running along side a 220V AC feed.

As Furd had mentioned, Keystone makes a variety of jack plates and fittings for verious types of services.
If you are looking to go CAT5, you can either use only 4 wires and connect them to an RJ11 (phone) jack, or use an RJ45 jack which will accept the smaller RJ11 connection, but can cause confusion down the line and maybe mistaken for a data jack.

If repair of the phone line is not required, and your looking to simply install a flush mount wall jack, consider sticking with the existing cable, and pick up a keystone face plate and low voltage box.
 
  #4  
Old 08-17-12, 06:51 AM
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For the wall plate, I suggest cutting a low voltage ring in the wall. The faceplate will then install onto that. This will require the cable to be inside the wall.
 
  #5  
Old 08-17-12, 07:48 AM
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I'm assuming you are refering to something like this?
[ATTACH=CONFIG]2671[/ATTACH]


I used this or similar in my old house when I wired all the rooms with network and voice. fairly cheap (<$3 each at a big box store). Worked good with thick plaster and drywall.
 
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  #6  
Old 08-17-12, 11:35 AM
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I'm actually upgrading from flat telephone cable (the kind that comes with phones) to something twisted, which I assumed would work better near 220v. I just need two wires though, and I don't know how I'd ground them. I live in a building built in the 1960s and the receptical appears to be a high voltage box with many telephone wires running through it in a bundle.

I wasn't clear enough in my post (but I'm glad I added extra info because I got some useful comments on it). All I wanted was a wall plate with a hole that a cat5 cable fits perfectly in. Or, a plug that fits an RJ11 jack and can be attached to a round (twisted wire inside) cat5 cable. Do they make either of those? I downloaded Keystone's catalog, but it's huge and I couldn't find anything like that.

BTW, the wall mount jack in the bedroom will be attached to a plastic electronics enclosure that I'll surface mount. I'm not using a regular surface mount phone jack because I'll be installing an RG6 plug in the side of the enclosure and I need the room.
 

Last edited by Borad; 08-17-12 at 12:08 PM.
  #7  
Old 08-17-12, 11:49 AM
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These are also available at your local homecenter.

RJ-11 WALL PLATE BEIGE-MPJA, Inc.
 
  #8  
Old 08-17-12, 12:05 PM
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These are also available at your local homecenter.

RJ-11 WALL PLATE BEIGE-MPJA, Inc.
Yeah, my local Home Depot just got those in as a "new" product. That's going in the bedroom, but I need something that accepts a round cat5 cable for the living room, and I don't want an RJ45 jack because of the confusion that Northern Mike mentioned.
 
  #9  
Old 08-17-12, 12:11 PM
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I don't know what you mean when you write, "...accepts a round cat5 cable...". Do you want a wall plate that just has a hole in the center? These are available at the homecenter as well.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]2685[/ATTACH]
(Image courtesy of showmecables.com)
 
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  #10  
Old 08-17-12, 12:46 PM
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But that hole is larger than cat5 size and will accumulate dust and whatever else falls in the gap. I'd rather drill a hole in a blank plate. And if I "use straps that will hold the cable in place but not crush it" then the connection to the wall will only be as strong as the single shortest wire from the cable that's connected to the wall. I have to either use carefully hammered staples near the plate or I want a "a plug that fits an RJ11 jack and can be attached to a round (twisted wire inside) cat5 cable."
 
  #11  
Old 08-17-12, 12:52 PM
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You want an RJ11 jack, why not just use an RJ11 plate?

Like this:
http://www.kingofaccessories.com/pro...53741_zoom.jpg
 
  #12  
Old 08-17-12, 01:05 PM
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You want an RJ11 jack, why not just use an RJ11 plate?
I want an RJ11 jack only if a matching plug will fit a round cat5. If they make RJ11 plugs for round cat5 cable, I'll do that, but I can't find any.
 
  #13  
Old 08-17-12, 01:20 PM
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You'll have to cut the casing back. Like I mentioned earlier, CAT3 is phone, so finding a jack that will support CAT5 is unlikely.
 
  #14  
Old 08-17-12, 01:38 PM
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Buy a nylon (unbreakable) blank plate in the color of your choice and then drill the appropriately sized hole in it.
 
  #15  
Old 08-17-12, 01:42 PM
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The cable doesn't matter, it's the jack which is important - you're only going to hook up two of the wires in the cable to the jack anyway (four if you want two lines available) if this is for a phone/RJ11.
 
  #16  
Old 08-17-12, 01:59 PM
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I want an RJ11 jack only if a matching plug will fit a round cat5.
Do you mean a male plug? If so you are misunderstanding how it is normally done. You install the female jack plate as earlier shown. Then you run a patch cord with two male plugs between the RJ11 and the phone you do not plug the Cat-5 into the phone which seems to be what you are trying to do. The Cat five is wired to the back of the RJ11 jack.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 08-17-12 at 02:29 PM.
  #17  
Old 08-17-12, 02:27 PM
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I think this is what I'm looking for. "Male/Male Twisted Pair RJ11 Cable." It's the twistedness that I want because it will be near 220 volts. I don't really care if it's not cat5. One end will be plugged in a telephone jack and the other will go through the wall and into a wall mount jack, so I'll cut the plug off of that end. The phone will have a regular flat RJ11 cable that's plugged into that jack. If I could get it in the U.S. I think that's what I'm looking for.
 
  #18  
Old 08-17-12, 02:32 PM
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I think this is what I'm looking for
Yes and no. That is what you will use as a patch cord as shown below but you don't run it through the wall. that is done with the Cat 5 between the female jack plates. The Cat5 it is striped and fastened to the screws of each jack plate or surface jack.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 08-17-12 at 02:49 PM.
  #19  
Old 08-18-12, 12:36 AM
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I just figured out a better route that keeps the cable away from the air conditioner cord. Now I'm really not sure it's worth a dollar per foot for the cable I chose. It wouldn't really bother me to run non-cat cable between plates. Now I'm just deciding whether to spend the $25 for 25 feet of "High Speed Internet Modem Cable" instead of using the flat cable that's working fine.
 
  #20  
Old 08-18-12, 06:01 AM
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If your just using it for voice, Cat 3 cable is just fine. $1 per foot is a way too expensive for voice.
 
  #21  
Old 08-18-12, 07:02 AM
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nstead of using the flat cable that's working fine.
The flat cable is not intended for the purpose you have been using it for. You need Cat3 round as suggested by Toylyn. The 240 volt line is not an issue.
 
  #22  
Old 08-18-12, 12:45 PM
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OK, now I'm getting somewhere. I could use CAT5 cable with a CAT3 RJ11 Plug for Round Solid Wire.

Oh....it says CAT3...still looking...
 
  #23  
Old 08-18-12, 02:30 PM
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OK, I'll use CAT5 cable with a RJ45 plug. I'll plug it into a surface mount RJ45 jack that I'll put inside the wall, and the cable will come out the side of a wall plate. The surface mount box will make the cable more resistant to being pulled out than if I just relied on the strength of spliced wires. At the bedroom end, the surface mount box will go inside a larger surface mount box that I'll turn into a phone jack/coax jack combo. The phone company actually put a surface mount box inside a phone box in the bedroom decades ago and I was wondering why until today. Probably for strain relief. Much better method than clamping a wall plate on the cable, which was done in the kitchen.
 
  #24  
Old 08-18-12, 02:41 PM
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OK, I'll use CAT5 cable with a RJ45 plug. I'll plug it into a surface mount RJ45 jack
No. You will strip it and wrap it around the screws. No plug is involved. You do not buy a cord with plugs. You buy a length of Cat3 or Cat5 cable. It does not have plugs nor does it need plugs. It simply is connected to the screws of the two jacks.

Please look at the picture in post 18 again.
 
  #25  
Old 08-18-12, 02:59 PM
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It simply is connected to the screws of the two jacks.
That's fine, but then I'd want to use something like this cushioned cable clamp inside the box to help prevent the cable from being pulled out of the wall. I just hope it's not too hard to find a small quantity of something like that. Remember that the cable won't be inside the wall and could accidently get hit or pulled or something, especially if I don't staple it tightly to the wall.
 
  #26  
Old 08-18-12, 03:13 PM
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You are making this a lot harder then it needs to be by over thinking it. Just use insulated staples with Cat3 cable.
Example: Screen Staples - Specialty - Tacks & Brads - Fasteners - 9 Double Point Staples Black Finish 1 5
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If you have an unfinished crawl space or basement run through that.

They do make a special stapler for cat 3 but spending $30+ dollars for a special tool makes no sense.
 
  #27  
Old 08-18-12, 03:43 PM
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I'll slip some heat shrink tubing around the cable under the plate and heat half of it so the unshrunk end will prevent the cable from being pulled out. Then I'll use:



because the insulated ones are ugly.
 
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Old 08-18-12, 04:54 PM
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Hey, I grew up with the ugly ones! Those you pictured should do it.
 
  #29  
Old 08-18-12, 04:56 PM
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Ok. Am I understanding this correctly? You are running a data cable outside the wall from one phone jack into another room to operate another phone jack? But the jack in the other room is going to be an in wall jack? So you are going to put the surface run cable between the face plate and the wall? Why? Why don't you use a surface mount phone jack? That would be the appropriate device for this instance.
 
  #30  
Old 08-18-12, 06:16 PM
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Why don't you use a surface mount phone jack?
In the bedroom, where the phone will be, there will be nothing in-wall except for cables that go through the wall. I'll put a flush mount phone jack on top of a surface mount box because I want a combination coaxial cable/phone jack without cutting away the wall.

The jack that will power the bedroom's surface mount jack currently exists. It will be either the livingroom jack or one from a different part of the bedroom, which are both flush. For those jacks, I want the cable coming out from the side of the plate because I don't want an RJ45 jack to mislead anyone into thinking it's anything other than a phone line. Also, I assume the connection is better with fewer plugs, which is probably why I'm being told not to use a patch cable there.

So, I guess you could say I'll have a hard-wired connection up to my new bedroom jack. Only in that new jack will the phone be plugged in.
 
  #31  
Old 08-18-12, 06:29 PM
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I'm honestly having trouble figuring out why the OP felt the need to "upgrade". If the only thing on the line is a phone - no dialup modems, DSL, alarm systems, LifeAlert, etc etc, then theres no need to go through any of this. The flat cable stapled to the baseboard is all you need - and it'll be less conspicuous than Cat5 and a huge honking Plugmold box. Unless you own the apartment, you'll have to take it all out when you leave anyway.
 
  #32  
Old 08-18-12, 06:44 PM
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I'm honestly having trouble figuring out why the OP felt the need to "upgrade".
I switched from DSL to cable so I have to have a new cable coming out of the wall one way or another. I chose to install a jack near my computer instead of having a cable in the room that can't be removed when I paint. Also, I'll be selling the apartment some day (yes, I own it) and the jack will look nicer, especially if the cable isn't needed by the next occupants. As long as I'm adding the surface mount box for a cable jack, I decided to use the same box for a phone jack instead of having a flat phone cable coming through the wall as it is now. And since attaching the flat phone cable to the back of a jack and plugging another cable into the front of a jack and into the phone seems to be frowned upon, I'm switching to CAT5. If I end up using the living room jack to feed the bedroom jack, I'll also have to worry about a future air conditioner interfering with the flat cable if I don't upgrade.
 
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