damaged armored cable

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Old 08-21-12, 08:30 PM
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damaged armored cable

I have 14/2 armored cable connecting the under cabinet lights in my kitchen back to the wall switch. The spiral metal armor jacket has separated a bit near where the cable comes out of the wall. I suspect it was bent at too small a radius. There is no damage to the internal conductors or the internal bonding strip. Is there any method to repair the jacket? The cable runs behind the cabinets and makes several turns to reach the switch so replacing it is not really an option.

Any thoughts on the proper course of action?

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 08-21-12, 08:50 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

I have 14/2 armored cable connecting the under cabinet lights in my kitchen back to the wall switch. The spiral metal armor jacket has separated a bit near where the cable comes out of the wall... Any thoughts on the proper course of action?
The answer to your question is probably "replace the cable."

Certainly the damaged section needs to be replaced. There may be ways to do that without replacing the entire run.

Some pictures would help us see what you're looking at. See How To Put Pictures In Your Post.
 
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Old 08-21-12, 09:07 PM
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Thanks for the reply. Here are two pictures that show the damage. I can take more during daylight hours if these are not good enough.

http://i1242.photobucket.com/albums/...s/fd42651a.jpg

http://i1242.photobucket.com/albums/...s/96beb039.jpg
 
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Old 08-22-12, 05:29 AM
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IF you can, I would make the break the point where I would attach the connector. Then install the light there or install a small box. Replacing the cable looks very difficult to do without damaging the wall.
 
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Old 08-22-12, 07:08 AM
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I don't think I can get the light connected, but a small box is a good idea. I could also go through from the outside (this is on an exterior stucco wall) and add a junction box that is accessible ~10' off the ground. Would this still qualify as accessible?
 
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Old 08-22-12, 07:27 AM
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I could also go through from the outside (this is on an exterior stucco wall) and add a junction box that is accessible ~10' off the ground. Would this still qualify as accessible?
Yes, but then you'd have to deal with making that box and the penetrated wall weatherproof.

As a suggestion, you could use a 90[SUP]o[/SUP] MC connector, possibly with a 1/2" galvanized coupling and a chase nipple, to connect the cable and feed the wire into a shallow box mounted face down to the bottom of the cabinet.

Name:  chase nipple.jpg
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Old 08-22-12, 12:20 PM
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Going along Nashkat's thinking, you could also install a cable connector, a tomic coupling, a flex connector and a short (less than 6') piece flex conduit.

Or install a cable to conduit (EMT) fitting.
 

Last edited by Tolyn Ironhand; 08-22-12 at 12:44 PM.
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Old 08-22-12, 02:24 PM
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Good ideas, I think I can see this working without having to tear up wall and take out cabinets. Toyln, I'm not familiar with a tomic connector and google only leads me to these:

1/2 Inch Tomic Connector - ARLBT50 | Wholesale Electrical Supply Company

My guess this is not what you had in mind. Does your tomic have threaded female connections on both sides to join two connectors. Anyway, would your approach avoid the box under the cabinet? I am under the impression that AC cannot be transitioned to flex/EMT without a box (but this could just be my ignorance about all the possible connectors and allowed transitions). Not having to add a small box would look a bit nicer, but I guess I could always paint the box to help hide it.

This whole problem got me thinking. What if this had happened inside the wall where it was not visible and it was not discovered? I realize the conductors would not be protected by the break, but would I also have to worry about not having a good ground since the jacket split? I would think that the jacket pulling apart like this must happen occasionally and not be discovered. This seems like a big minus to AC (or a least the newer stuff with the aluminum jacket, the steel jacket seems much tougher to me).

Thanks again.
 
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Old 08-22-12, 04:21 PM
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I am under the impression that AC cannot be transitioned to flex/EMT without a box
If the conductors are long enough, you can build a transition coupling using an MC connector, a flex connector and, as you guessed, a galvanized 1/2"coupling. This could go inside the wall. You could then loop the flex to avoid making a sharp bend, and bring it out under thr bottom of the upper cabinet.

What if this had happened inside the wall where it was not visible and it was not discovered? I realize the conductors would not be protected by the break, but would I also have to worry about not having a good ground since the jacket split?
Is there no ground wire in the cable? Even if there isn't, and the sheath is serving as the EGC, you would have continuity to ground so long as the steel spiral did not break in two.
 
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Old 08-22-12, 07:34 PM
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If the conductors are long enough, you can build a transition coupling using an MC connector, a flex connector and, as you guessed, a galvanized 1/2"coupling. This could go inside the wall.
That is great to learn and I think the best option as no visible box to add. I'll probably tackle this weekend.

Is there no ground wire in the cable


No dedicated ground, but there is a bonding strip.
 
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Old 08-22-12, 08:08 PM
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That is great to learn and I think the best option as no visible box to add.
You need to support the transition coupling and the cable inside the wall. You need to preserve the bonding strip through the transition and the FMC. And, just for grins, since it's going inside the wall, I think I would add a drop of Loktite to each set of male threads as I was assembling the transition coupling.
 
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Old 08-22-12, 08:49 PM
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Nash has the right coupling, It is similar to a rigid coupling but not as long. Female on both ends.

While the jack has come separated, it is not broken, so your grounding path is still OK. This is also why there is that bonding strip.

I never suggest using dope or locktight on electrical fittings.
 
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Old 08-22-12, 09:11 PM
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I never suggest using dope or locktight on electrical fittings.
I hear you, Tolyn. Let me clarify by saying that I would ONLY use the one that you can take apart again. NOT the one that locks things together for good. If I used any.
 
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Old 08-23-12, 04:58 AM
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I hear you, Tolyn. Let me clarify by saying that I would ONLY use the one that you can take apart again. NOT the one that locks things together for good. If I used any.
I wouldn't use any at all because it makes the connection less conductive.
 
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Old 08-23-12, 06:34 AM
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I wouldn't use any at all because it makes the connection less conductive.
Point taken. Thanks, Justin.
 
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