Connecting an oven without a red wire - how to do it?

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  #1  
Old 08-21-12, 10:26 PM
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Connecting an oven without a red wire - how to do it?

I have new wire installed in the home (#8 copper) that is black, white and a ground (bare wire) - 240 volts. It is to be hooked up to an oven which has a red, black, white and bare wire. The instruction manual says the house wiring has a red wire but mine does not. It can be hooked up to 3 wires or 4. Because I don't have a red wire I am at a loss as to how to hook it up. Any suggestions?
 

Last edited by pcboss; 08-22-12 at 05:14 AM. Reason: voltage
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  #2  
Old 08-21-12, 10:39 PM
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Unfortunately you are screwed, blued and tattooed. Your oven is obviously a 240/120 volt device and you have only 240 volts available from that installed cable. Your only recourse is to replace the cable.

Sorry.
 
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Old 08-22-12, 02:34 AM
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Welcome to the forums! Did you install the wiring? If you had it professionally done, call them back out and have them do it according to code. You should be running a 4 wire cable, which will have a black, white, red and grounding wire.
 
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Old 08-22-12, 05:16 AM
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New wiring should have met the new code requirements and been a 4 wire. These requirements have been in place for quite awhile.
 
  #5  
Old 08-22-12, 05:38 AM
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Thank you for your replies. The house was stripped of its wiring (bought as a foreclosure) and its a two story house, so to correct the wiring the sheetrock in the ceiling has to be taken down (all repaired right now) to replace the wiring.......... again, ouch.

I am going to have a good talk to my electrician today.
 
  #6  
Old 08-22-12, 09:00 AM
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Wiring can often be run with out removing Sheetrock by "fishing" so it is possible only minimal or no damage will be done to the Sheetrock depending on location of the oven.
 
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Old 08-22-12, 12:01 PM
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maybe he thought he was wiring a dryer outlet.
 
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Old 08-22-12, 01:01 PM
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maybe he thought he was wiring a dryer outlet.
Dryer receptacles are four wire also and they are not #8.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 08-22-12 at 04:56 PM. Reason: correct typo
  #9  
Old 08-22-12, 03:34 PM
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Type SE with 3 conductors used to be an acceptable wiring method where the bare was used as both the neutral and ground. Type NM was not allowed to use the bare as the neutral and ground.
 
  #10  
Old 08-22-12, 03:51 PM
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3-wire 120/240 appliance circuits have been illegal since 1996.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 08-22-12 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Remove quote from deleted post.
  #11  
Old 08-22-12, 05:27 PM
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I am going to have a good talk to my electrician today.
If this guy sold himself as an electrician, you better have a good look around at what else he's done. He evidently doesn't know the basics of the NEC. Not only is a 3-wire 120/240 volt range circuit no longer allowed, 2-wire type NM cable with a bare ground has NEVER been allowed for the range circuit you need.
 
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